Man critically injured during World Series celebration

Courtesy of Barber Rome/ivbarberloungePricey party: The financial toll of post-World Series mayhem and fires is still being reviewed

Courtesy of Barber Rome/ivbarberloungePricey party: The financial toll of post-World Series mayhem and fires is still being reviewed

A man is fighting for his life after he was viciously beaten over the head with a metal object during a dust-up with at least five thugs Sunday while celebrating the Giants’ World Series victory in the Upper Haight neighborhood.

The incident was just one example of the madness that resulted from the revelry citywide. Fights, vandalism and dozens of fires raged throughout San Francisco, but mostly in the Mission district. Police Chief Greg Suhr called the destructive behavior worse than the aftermath of the Giants’ 2010 title.

Police reported Tuesday that an unidentified 37-year-old man who had been on Haight Street after the win was surrounded by five men who beat him with a metal object. He suffered “massive head trauma,” police said. He told his roommate the attack occurred sometime between 9:30 and 10:30 p.m. and somewhere between Stanyan Street and Masonic Avenue.

No arrests have been reported.

Arrests citywide stemming from the mayhem totaled 36, including 23 for felony offenses. The Police Department has presented 11 of those cases to the District Attorney’s Office for formal charges.

Nine of the 11 defendants are being charged with crimes that include assault on a police officer, negligent discharge of a firearm, robbery, resisting arrest with force, threats, battery and arson of property, prosecutors said.

The defendants, the majority of whom are from San Francisco, are expected to be arraigned today.

City Attorney Dennis Herrera said Tuesday that he intends to sue vandals over the damage.  

One particularly expensive victim of the rioting was a $700,000 Muni bus that had just received a $300,000 taxpayer investment. The bus was smashed up, torched and totaled near Third and Market streets. One man was reportedly beaten up while trying to intervene.

A Facebook campaign was started to help police find one of the bus bashers. Dressed in Giants gear, the vandal was photographed hurling a large metal gate at the windshield.

“Please help the SFPD locate this jerk that used the Giants celebration as a reason to destroy things and endanger people,” reads the Facebook page operated by Polk Street nightclub Red Devil Lounge. “This isn’t what San Francisco is about.”

KGO-TV reported Tuesday that police had identified the man and planned to arrest him.

The destruction led city officials to announce a zero-tolerance policy for today’s victory parade from downtown to Civic Center. Mayor Ed Lee and Suhr emphasized Tuesday that the parade is a “family event.”

“The officers will be after it in earnest,” Suhr said.

The total cost of Sunday night and Monday morning’s damage is “under review,” Lee said.

maldax@sfexaminer.com
Staff Writer Dan Schreiber contributed to this report.

Bay Area NewsCrimeCrime & CourtsMission districtSan Francisco

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