Major crimes continue to decline citywide, except for homicides

Most violent and property crimes — excluding homicides — continued on a downward trend over the first half of this year, according to the latest statistics from the San Francisco Police Department.

Assaults, robberies, rapes, burglaries, auto break-ins and larcenies are all down year to date and month to month, according to the department’s Compstat data, a compilation of reported crimes citywide as of June 30.

One major exception was homicides, which continued to rise. In June and July, for instance, 11 people were killed across San Francisco. There were 26 homicides by the end of June of this year, compared to 24 by the end of June 2015.

There were 28 homicides by the end of July 2015, while this year The City had seen 30 homicides before August, according to previous reporting by the San Francisco Examiner.

Despite the decline in most crimes this year, The City has not seen crime drop below levels seen in 2012 or 2013.

Homicides again are an outlier in such trends. Starting in 2008 The City’s average of about 100 homicides a year was cut in half and have hovered around 50 in each subsequent year.

Crimes by the numbers

Robberies declined 21 percent year over year, with 1,506 reported by the end of this June compared to 1,911 in June 2015.

Aggravated assaults had a much smaller decline, but still dropped by 4 percent. There were 1,310 reported aggravated assaults by the end of this June compared to 1,370 in 2015.

Reported rapes saw a 1 percent decline so far this year with 207 being reported compared to 209 by this time last year. Human trafficking reports also declined by 13 percent so far this year; by June 2015 there had been 38 reported case compared to 33 so far this year.

Burglaries declined in the first six months of this year by 9 percent compared to 2015. Thus far this year 2,487 burglaries have been reported, compared to 2,723 in 2015.

Larcenies, or petty thefts, saw a 15 percent decline from 21,606 larcenies reported by the end of June 2015 to 18,453 in the same time this year.

Auto break-ins, which police have especially concentrated on reducing in recent years, dropped an eye-popping 27 percent. The first six months of 2015 had 31,605 reported motor vehicle break-ins compared to only 26,759 this year.

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