Low-income families get free admission to Golden Gate Park gardens

Popular sites now easier to access for visitors receiving government food assistance benefits

The San Francisco Botanical Garden, Conservatory of Flowers and Japanese Tea Garden will now offer free admission of up to four people for visitors receiving government food assistance benefits.

San Francisco residents who receive CalFresh or Medi-Cal can get up to four free tickets when they show their Electronic Benefit Transfer (EBT) card or Medi-Cal card and proof of San Francisco residency. Non-residents who receive CalFresh or SNAP benefits can also grab four tickets when they show their EBT card.

With admission fees ranging from $20 to $38 for a family of four to visit, access to these educational and cultural institutions for low-income families is often difficult.

“Access to nature is more important than ever and Golden Gate Park in particular has been an oasis for so many of us during COVID-19,” said Mayor London Breed. “All San Franciscans, regardless of their income, should have access to the art and cultural institutions that our city has to offer. Now income won’t be a barrier in preventing visitors to the Park from taking in our beautiful Botanical Garden, visiting the Conservatory of Flowers, and exploring history at the oldest public Japanese garden in the country.”

This new amenity is due to the three San Francisco Recreation and Park Department institutions joining Museums for All, a national access program of the Institute of Museum and Library Services and administered by the Association of Children’s Museums that “aims to break down that barrier to open doors of opportunity for families to experience cultural education programming.”

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