Local pro gardener encouraging donations to programs

Local professional gardener Kim Haworth has teamed with Hansen’s Natural and the National Gardening Association to encourage San Franciscans to help raise $10,000 for Bay Area schools’ gardening programs.

How are you helping to raise money for school programs? Hansen’s is celebrating San Francisco with an online contest where people can post a photo and vote for other people’s photos. For every photo that receives a vote, 10 cents goes to a children’s gardening program in the Bay Area. 

Why is gardening important for kids? Gardening keeps you connected with the Earth. It opens the door to learning that kids can feel and take part in.

What do you encourage people to plant in the Bay Area? I’m standing on a soapbox for planting indigenous plants native to California because so many of those plants have been lost and they don’t require any water, fertilizer or pesticides. They hold the soil to prevent erosion. For example, the Cotoneaster produces fall berries and it’s a nicely shaped plant.

What’s one of your favorite plants? It’s called the Matilija poppy and it blooms all summer long, with 8-inch flowers that look like fried eggs. They’re beautiful and they don’t require any care at all.

What’s your favorite nursery? I would say probably the Sloat [Garden Center]. They have a knowledgeable staff and are just great. And a nursery will always order plants for you if they don’t have what you want.

Bay Area NewsLocal

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Second grader Genesis Ulloa leads students in an after-school community hub in a game at the Mission YMCA on Friday, May 7, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
SF parents face school year with hope, trepidation and concern

‘Honestly, I don’t know how I’m going to deal with it’

Health care workers in the intensive care unit at Providence Saint John’s Health Center in Santa Monica, with Alejandro Balderas, a 44-year-old patient who later died. Even in California, a state with a coronavirus vaccination rate well above average, the number of people hospitalized with COVID-19 has nearly doubled in the past two weeks, according to a New York Times database. (Isadora Kosofsky/The New York Times)
Why COVID took off in California, again

‘The good news is: The vaccines are working’

Lake Oroville stood at 33 percent full and 40 percent of historical average when this photograph was taken on Tuesday, June 29, 2021. (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times via Tribune News Service)
A kayaker on the water at Lake Oroville, which stands at 33 percent full and 40 percent of historical average when this photograph was taken on Tuesday, June 29, 2021 in Oroville, Calif. (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times via Tribune News Service)
Facing ‘dire water shortages,’ California bans Delta pumping

By Rachel Becker CalMatters In an aggressive move to address “immediate and… Continue reading

Most Read