Local arts community mourning benefactor

Kati Kim gave a unique community of artists, designers and craftspeople a leg up by selling their goods and showing their art in her two stores. Now that community has begun to use its online networking power to support her after the death of her husband, James Kim.

The Kims owned two boutiques in San Francisco, and made a point of selling clothing, crafts and housewares created by local and independent designers and craftspeople. In addition to selling local and independently made goods, the Kim’s Lower Haight clothing store Doe hosts quarterly art shows featuring primarily local artists.

James Kim, 35, was found dead Wednesday after an exhaustive five-day search that included the Monday rescue of Kati Kim, 30, and her two daughters, Penelope, 4, and Sabine, 7 months. He walked off to search for help after the family spent a week stranded in the snowy Klamath Mountains.

Upon hearing the news of James’ death, artists, crafters and designers have started to work together — mostly via the Internet — to send money, gifts and love to Kati and the children.

“She has a lot of the high-end and independent designer clothing in the store but she’s also really into having locally produced goods. That’s something they were both really into,” said Charlie Wright, manager of the Kims’ Church Street Apothecary store.

San Francisco artist Lisa Congdon, who sells headbands, bibs and other items at Doe, has begun to organize an online art auction to raise money for the family. Working with her mother, Gerrie Congdon, and her sister, Stephanie Barnes, both of Portland, Ore., Lisa Congdon used her extensive online network to solicit items to sell.

“A lot of indie artists and craftspeople have blogs, and that’s how we’ve created this community,” Lisa Congdon said. “A lot of people all over the world were following the story through our blogs because initially they weren’t learning about it on their own news.”

When Wright reported the Kims missing on Nov. 28, she posted alerts on Myspace and other online forums. Within hours, those bulletins had been copied and re-posted all over the Internet.

How you can help

To donate items for the auction to help the Kim family, please visit: www.birdinthehand.typepad.com. Monetary donations can be made through the website set up by the family’s friends: www.jamesandkati.com.

amartin@examiner.com

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Indoor dining at John’s Grill. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
State’s mask mandate to continue until June 15 reopening despite CDC guidance

By Eli Walsh Bay City News Foundation California will wait until next… Continue reading

International Bird Rescue helped save Bay Area birds that were contaminated by mysterious goo in 2015. (Mike Koozmin/S.F. Examiner file photo)
International Bird Rescue marks 50 years of wildlife protection

Group established in wake of massive oil spill continues essential rehabilitation, research

A cyclist heads past an artistic sign onto Page Street, a Slow Street, at Stanyan Street near Golden Gate Park on Monday, April 12, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Push to make street closures permanent meets with resistance

Hastily thrown together during the pandemic, Slow Streets program now struggles to build support

Agnes Liang, who will be a senior at Mission High School, is running for one of the two student representative seats on the San Francisco Unified School District Board of Education. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Turbulent year on school board leaves student delegates undeterred

Around this time last year, Shavonne Hines-Foster and Kathya Correa Almanza were… Continue reading

Most Read