Litterbugs pack too much trash

About 30 of the dirtiest lawbreakers in the Mission district were cited for not having any garbage service during three predusk trash sweeps last week, despite several warnings.

From Tuesday to Thursday last week, city workers patrolled the busiest merchant corridors in the neighborhood and wrote tickets to property owners who failed to deal with eyesores such as overflowing garbage bins or piled-up cigarette butts.

It was the first week of the Department of Public Works’ Spruce Up by Sun Up campaign, and the agency has already targeted hundreds of nuisances.

More than 100 property owners were slapped with $100 warnings for not maintaining trees, about 100 for not cleaning graffiti and 19 for grimy, litter-filled sidewalks, along with several other violations.

“We actually gave the businesses a schedule beforehand, so they knew we were coming and what we were looking for,” Public Works spokeswoman Christine Falvey said. “It was enforcement time.”

Last year, legislation was passed requiring all businesses to maintain garbage service to deter them from relying on The City to clean up the messes. The legislation allows Public Works to issue citations instead of waiting for complaints and then holding a public hearing.

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