Library celebrates banned 'Mockingbird'

Among the books that have been banned most in America is one of its most beloved: “To Kill A Mockingbird” by Harper Lee.

And the San Francisco Public Library is devoting much of this year’s Banned Books Week to honor that novel’s 50th anniversary.

The American Library Association’s annual Banned Books Week started Saturday, and The City’s library system is celebrating it with an event and contest for teens.

On Tuesday, the library will host a screening of the documentary “Hey, Boo: To Kill A Mockingbird & Harper Lee” in the Koret Auditorium at the Main Library on Larkin Street. After the screening, San Francisco authors Jewelle Gomez, Andrew Sean Greer and Michelle Richmond will speak.

Also in honor of the week, every day this week the library’s teen blog will highlight banned books and offer “challenge questions.” If teens can answer all five questions correctly they will be entered in a drawing to win a flip camcorder.

kworth@sfexaminer.com

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