Letters: September 14, 2006

A governor behaving badly

If what you’ve reported is true, our Governator is dangerously out of touch with reality.

If he claims that the Angelides campaign has “behaved badly,” that’s just the pot calling the kettle black. His unfair media attack on Angelides with regard to taxes completely disregards the role of the Assembly — an issue this governor has had no end of problems with before.

But a criticism of the Angelides campaign for obtaining the audio and turning it over to the newspaper is flawed in that it fails to acknowledge that the Angelides camp would be irresponsible and dangerously unaware if it had NOT obtained the audio and, criticizing the campaign for turning it over to the newspaper is an attempt to censor free speech and the citizen’s right to know the truth regarding an important issue that bears on the upcoming election.

Claiming that it is “wrong, it’s unethical and it’s a very big deal” is only accurate with regard to its being “a very big deal.”

Carl Noe

The City

The Market Street mess

If Supervisor Chris Daly continues to have his way, the mess on Market Street will not only remain the same, but — in accordance with his fellow obstructionists on the board — get progressively worse. Even as everyday citizens attempt to make SoMa a better place to live by creating such things as benefit districts to improve everyone’s quality of life, Supervisor Daly does everything in his power to gut their efforts as he, once again, legislates ideology over public policy. So I not only fear that the streets of SoMa will remain as squalid as six years ago when Daly first took office, but under his continued watch, will become even more insanely dangerous under a possibly lame duck supervisorial term.

Peter Streitz

The City

Below-average colleges

That California state colleges have been given a “C-” grade for affordability, making us No. 1 with Utah while the other states essentially failed, is consistent with the peculiar direction the nation is

taking.

It appears that an educated work force is simply the next commodity that we, as a culture, believe we can purchase from other countries. We seem to be content to consume our oil, food, manufactured goods and everything else from offshore.

Moreover, one has to look at the adult role models today’s youth are emulating — which does figure into whether they even aspire to go to college — and we see essentially vacuous, inarticulate and poorly educated persons ranging from movie stars and rock musicians to spineless politicians and reality TV “McCelebrities.”

Still, California has doubled its investmentin need-based financial aid since 1993 only to see the graduation rate fall to half of that of Great Britain. Many of those who do graduate have been raised in the milieu that “everyone is a winner” and mediocre performance is socially acceptable; hence, a “C-” is the new “A.” Who needs to compete in the global economy when we can consume our way into second-class oblivion?

Matt Mitguard

The City

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