Last chapter for seedy Tenderloin club?

A Tenderloin adult nightclub that earned the ire of neighbors and city officials alike for noise and violence was ordered closed by a Superior Court judge Wednesday.

The club recently closed its doors voluntarily after the City Attorney’s Office filed a motion to shutter the nightclub, which would often operate after hours. The court ordered the club to stay closed for one year.

The City Attorney’s Office complained of “illicit drug sales, prostitution, extended hours permit violations, illegal alcohol consumption, noise nuisance violations, and repeated episodes of violence and disturbances of the peace in the surrounding neighborhood, which includes nearby senior housing.”

Even more intriguing was that the owner of the building, Terrance Alan, also serves on The City’s Entertainment Commission, which is set to receive broad powers to discipline problem nightclubs throughout San Francisco.

On Monday, Alan apologized to the Board of Supervisors City Operations and Neighborhood Services Committee about his tenant Pink Diamonds, and he promised to assist in evicting the operators.
 

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