Kids take to streets to kick obesity to curb

Hundreds of San Francisco youngsters will take to the streets Wednesday as part of the annual International Walk to School Day in an effort to fight childhood obesity and promote safe communities.

Roughly 30 public schools in San Francisco will participate, according to San Francisco Unified School District officials.

On Wednesday, Fairmount Elementary school students will start their day at 7:45 a.m. with the general manager of the Recreation and Parks Department, Phil Ginsburg, and Supervisor Bevan Dufty who will lead them in a “Walking School Bus” from the Upper Noe Recreation Center, at Sanchez and Days streets, to the school at 65 Chenery St.

Then at school students will receive prizes and unveil artwork celebrating the benefits of walking to school, according to district officials.

The event is sponsored by the Shape Up San Francisco Coalition, San Francisco Department of Public Health and the San Francisco Safe Routes to School program, which promotes safe walking and biking to school.

According to the Center for Disease Control, one in three children are obese in the United States. Efforts to increase physical activity and change student nutrition policies are aimed at helping those numbers.

 

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