Kicking yuletide foliage to the curb gives it a green second life

Getty Images file photo

Christmas is over, you have enjoyed the tree as long as you possibly can, and now the time has come to dispose of it. What do you do?

San Francisco’s trash-hauling company, Recology, provides tree pickup as part of its normal service, which remains the same throughout the holiday season.

Christmas tree collection takes place Jan. 3-7 and Jan. 9-13. Trees are supposed to be placed next to customers’ recycling, composting or trash bins.

All tinsel, decorations, plastic, stands and lights should be removed from the tree, and it should be cut in half if it’s in excess of 6 feet tall.

Recology recycles the trees. Pine needles have natural properties that resist composting, according to the company, but they work well as biomass, so the trees are brought to a recycling center and fed into a grinder. The needles and chips are brought to biomass facilities, one near Stockton and the other near Woodland.

Recycling

Christmas tree collection occurs during the following dates with normally scheduled trash collection service:

Jan. 3 to 7
Jan. 9 to 13

How to dispose of the tree:

– If in excess of 6 feet tall, cut in half
– Remove decorations, stands and lights
– Place it next to recycling, composting or trash bins

Source: Recology

jsabatini@sfexaminer.com

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