Jury deadlocks in S.F. dog-mauling case

District Attorney’s Office does not yet know if they will try mother a second time

A San Francisco jury Monday announced it was “hopelessly deadlocked” on charges against Maureen Faibish, a mother accused of felony child endangerment in the dog-mauling death of her 12-year-old son last spring.

Judge Anne Bouliane declared a mistrial after the jury of eight women and four men announced through their spokeswoman that they were deadlocked with 10 in favor of acquittal on the felony charge and seven in favor of conviction on the misdemeanor charge.

District Attorney Kamala Harris brought charges against Faibish last year after her son Nicholas Faibish was killed by the family’s two 70-pound pit bulls, Rex and Ella. Over the course of the trial, prosecutor Linda Moore tried to portray a mother who knowingly left her son at home with two dangerous dogs.

On June 3, 2005, Maureen Faibish came home from her daughter’s school picnic to find Nicholas, whom she’d told to stay in the garage away from the dogs, dead on the floor of her bedroom with the pit bulls licking his bloody body. Ella was in heat, and Nicholas had apparently been bitten on his arm and abdomen earlier in the day when he interfered with Rex’s mating attempts.

Nicholas had a learning disability and problems following directions, which Moore argued should have indicated he would leave the garage where he was left playing video games. The garage didn’t have a working toilet, and therefore Nicholas would be forced to go upstairs, where the dogs were, to use the bathroom, Moore argued.

But defense attorney Lidia Stiglich called Nicholas’ death “one page ripped” from the family’s story. She showed pictures of the family cuddling with the dogs and called a string of family members and friends who testified that the garage was used as a second living room and that the dogs were part of the family.

“Nicky would mind me,” Nicholas’ father and Maureen Faibish’s husband, Steven Faibish, said when he took the stand. “He was a good boy.”

Stiglich attempted to prove 40-year-old Maureen Faibish couldn’t have known what would happen that Friday, three days before the family moved to Oregon.

Maureen Faibish had several emotional breakdowns during the trial. When Assistant Medical Examiner Dr. Venus Azar testified that Nicholas’ nose had been ripped off during the attack and several of his teeth were removed, she erupted in tears and had to leave the courtroom. While testifying for the defense, Steven Faibish broke down and sobbed when Stiglich asked him to describe Nicholas.

Maureen Faibish was also transported to San Francisco General Hospital after she again broke down during the defense’s closing arguments Wednesday.

After the trial Monday, District Attorney’s Office administrative chief Linda Klee said, “We believe the evidence was strong enough to sustain a conviction, and obviously some jurors had a difficult time with it, probably because the defendant also had a sympathy factor — it was her son.”

Klee did not say whether the District Attorney’s Office would retry the case. That decision, she said, would be made during the next few weeks.

Faibish did not speak to the media after the trial, but Stiglich, her arm wrapped around her client, said she didn’t think a second prosecution was appropriate.

“I think the Faibish family has suffered enough throughout this process. I think we had a real hardworking jury, and if we have a hundred more hardworking juries, we’re always going to be here,” she said. She said of the jury, “they understand that people make mistakes, that parents make mistakes and that not all mistakes are criminal.”

Maureen Faibish is due back in court Sept. 11 to confer with the judge and the District Attorney's Office about the future, if any, of her case.

Bay Area NewsLocal

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Man suing SFPD alleging officers beat him with batons

Cop attorney fires back: police were ‘interrupting a dangerous domestic violence incident’

Drug overdose deaths surpass 300 in San Francisco

Three-year rise in fatalities ‘generally driven by fentanyl’

Preston finds support for District 5 navigation center at community meeting

Supervisor hopes to narrow down list of possible locations within months

Harvey Weinstein verdict: Jurors took women’s harrowing testimony to heart

To some legal experts, the Harvey Weinstein sexual assault trial came down… Continue reading

Oprah brings her 2020 vision to Chase Center

TV star, mogul shares wellness advice, personal stories

Most Read