Jefferson schools chief will not seek second term

After serving a single term on the Jefferson Elementary School Board, current Board President Anthony Dennis said he would not seek a second term in order to devote more time to his family and young son.

Dennis, 34, is the only board member with a child currently in the district. He said he expects to move to the mid-Peninsula area and did not want to create “an Ed Jew situation” by not living in the district he was supposed to represent.

The board president was alluding to the San Francisco supervisor who faces felony charges that he lied about where he lives in order to run for office.

Dennis’ move leaves incumbent Annette Hipona, 44, to face off against three challengers, all of whom are parents to young children either in or entering the school district. Without Dennis in the race, one of the three challengers is assured of a seat at the dais come December.

The deadline to file for candidacy ended Wednesday.

Engineer Jonathan Trawinski, 43, who entered the race last Friday; preschool teacher Adam Duran, 33; and realtor Hitomi Benedetti, 37; and Hipona will vie for two four-year term seats in the November election.

Trawinski, a design engineer in bioresearch instrumentation, has lived in the district since 2001 and has a child entering the first grade at JFK Elementary School and another child who will be a kindergartner in 2008.

Trawinski and Benedetti have both said the rift between the teachers and district administration this past year fueled his interest in running for the board.

“I just thought they should be treated with a bit more respect than they were getting,” Trawinski said.

As for Dennis’ future he said he expected to move closer to his work as a behavioral therapist for special education students in the San Mateo-Foster City School District and he wanted to spend more time with his son, a preschooler at Franklin Delano Roosevelt Elementary.

dsmith@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsLocal

Just Posted

Cabernet sauvignon grapes sat in a container after being crushed at Smith-Madrone Winery in St. Helena. (Courtesy Smith-Madrone Winery)
San Francisco’s ‘Champagne problems’ — Wine industry suffers supply chain woes

‘Everywhere you turn, things that were easy are no longer easy’

Glasses behind the bar at LUNA in the Mission District on Friday, Oct. 15, 2021. Glassware is just one of the many things restaurants have had trouble keeping in stock as supply chain problems ripple outward. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
SF restaurants face product shortages and skyrocketing costs

‘The supply chain crisis has impacted us in almost every way imaginable’

A Giants fans hangs his head in disbelief after the Dodgers won the NLDS in a controversial finish to a tight Game 5. (Chris Victorio/Special to The Examiner)
Giants dream season ends at the hands of the Dodgers, 2-1

A masterful game comes down to the bottom of the ninth, and San Francisco came up short

<strong>Workers with Urban Alchemy and the Downtown Streets Team clean at Seventh and Market streets on Oct. 12. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins> </strong>
<ins></ins>
Why is it so hard to keep San Francisco’s streets clean?

Some blame bureaucracy, others say it’s the residents’ fault

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi — seen in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday — touted Congressional Democrats’ infrastructure bill in San Francisco on Thursday. (Stefani Reynolds/The New York Times)
Pelosi touts infrastructure bill as it nears finish line

Climate change, social safety net among major priorities of Democrats’ 10-year funding measure

Most Read