Jamaica Hampton is accused of charging police officers with a glass bottle before he was shot in the Mission District on Dec. 7, 2019. (Screenshot)

Jamaica Hampton is accused of charging police officers with a glass bottle before he was shot in the Mission District on Dec. 7, 2019. (Screenshot)

Jamaica Hampton, man shot by police, is charged once again

A man who was shot by San Francisco police is facing a new set of charges for allegedly attacking officers with a glass bottle after a judge tossed the previous case against him.

The District Attorney’s Office filed seven felony charges including various counts of assault with a deadly weapon against 25-year-old Jamaica Hampton on Friday over his violent encounter with two officers in the Mission District on Dec. 7, 2019, court records show.

Last December, prosecutors secured a grand jury indictment against both Hampton and one of the two officers who opened fire on him during the incident, Christopher Flores. But a judge dismissed the previous charges against Hampton earlier this month after finding that prosecutors failed to prove during the grand jury proceedings that he was the person captured on video attacking the officers.

“We objected to the court’s dismissal, and are continuing to prosecute both the charges against Mr. Hampton as well as the charges against Mr. Flores as they each inflicted unlawful violence on each other,” said District Attorney’s Office spokesperson Rachel Marshall.

Authorities say the encounter started when Hampton rushed Flores and Officer Sterling Hayes with the bottle as the officers pulled up to the corner of Mission and 23rd streets in a marked SUV. Flores was struck over the head repeatedly with the bottle. Hayes was the first officer to open fire. After Hampton was struck and fell to the ground, video showed Flores approaching him and firing a single shot as Hampton rose to his knees.

Danielle Harris, a deputy public defender representing Hampton, called the latest charging decision “beyond disappointing.”

“SFPD held him more than accountable when two cops shot him again and again,” Harris said. “Mr. Hampton is in a stable home, in therapy, in school, and attempting to build a meaningful life despite the two permanent disabilities SFPD gave him. It is past time for the system to allow Mr. Hampton and his family the space to try to truly heal, instead of causing them further harm.”

Hampton was shot in the left leg and dominant arm numerous times, Harris said. He has since been largely unable to use his arm and had his leg amputated.

This is the third time Hampton will face criminal charges over the same incident. Interim District Attorney Suzy Loftus charged Hampton shortly after the shooting, but he remained in the hospital and was never arraigned on the complaint.

Then in January 2020, newly elected District Attorney Chesa Boudin withdrew the complaint against Hampton, saying that it would be unfair for his office to proceed with the case at the time while also investigating the two officers.

Boudin’s office later brought the case to the grand jury and secured an indictment, only to have the charges tossed earlier this month before being refiled Friday.

Hampton is expected to remain out of custody, according to Harris. His case is due back in court for arraignment Wednesday.

The case against Flores is ongoing. His attorney has argued that the officer fired in self-defense.

mbarba@sfexaminer.com

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