Screen grab of YouTube videoRoss Mirkarimi neighbor Ivory Madison on Friday released an ad attacking Supervisor Christina Olague for reinstating Mirkarimi as sheriff.

Ivory Madison blasts Olague for Mirkarimi vote

The woman who initiated the domestic violence investigation against Ross Mirkarimi made her most public statement about the incident in a political ad attacking Supervisor Christina Olague just four days before the election.

In a minute-long video released Friday, Ivory Madison says Olague “made sure the system didn’t work after all” by casting one of four votes on the Board of Supervisors to reinstate Mirkarimi as sheriff.

“I live in District 5 next door to a convicted batterer who is also our sheriff because Christina Olague thinks it’s OK to abuse your wife and still run a major law enforcement agency,” Madison says in the ad.

Madison, who is a next-door neighbor of Mirkarimi, called police after Mirkarimi’s wife, Eliana Lopez, confided with her about an arm bruise sustained during a New Year’s Eve fight with Mirkarimi, who was days away from being sworn in as sheriff. Madison has, until now, kept a low-profile during Mirkarimi’s criminal proceedings and official misconduct proceedings initiated by Mayor Ed Lee that failed to oust him from office.

The ad was produced by the political committee SF Women For Accountability, recently formed to unseat Olague, who was appointed by Lee to fill out the remainder of Mirkarimi’s term as District 5 supervisor. The committee is largely funded by Silicon Valley angel and prominent Lee supporter Ron Conway, his wife Gayle, and Linda Voigt, wife of real estate developer Thomas Coates.

Olague denounced the ad in a statement.

“Political attack ads are not the way to deal with domestic violence,” Oalgue said. “Politicizing this issue in this way is silencing survivors in a way that’s dangerous and insensitive.”

Olague also attacked the political committee’s backers as “two billionaires with a direct interest in tipping the balance of power on the Board of Supervisors.” 

Andrea Shorter, a longtime advocate for women’s issues and the head of the political group SF Women For Accountability, said voters remain upset over Mirkarimi’s reinstatement. She said Madison called her asking if she could help.

Shorter also said that Olague may criticize money from Conway now, but she had accepted $500 donations from the Conway’s before the Mirkarimi vote.

“It wasn’t dirty money then,” Shorter said.

jsabatini@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsGovernment & PoliticsLocalPolitics

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Police release an image a cracked windshield on a Prius that Cesar Vargas allegedly tried to carjack. Vargas, who was shot by police a short time later, can be seen in videos jumping on the windshield and pushing a Muni passenger who disembarked from a bus. (Courtesy SFPD
SFPD releases videos of deadly police shooting

Cesar Vargas killed after reports of carjacking with knife

New legislation would make sure supportive housing tenants don’t pay more than 30 percent of their income for rent.. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner))
Supportive housing tenants could get more help paying the rent

Supportive housing tenants struggling to pay rent could soon see their payments… Continue reading

Organizers of the San Francisco International Arts Festival had planned to use parts of Fort Mason including the Parade Ground, Eucalyptus Grove and Black Point Battery to host performances by about a dozen Bay Area arts groups. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Arts festival sues city over permit denial

Organizer says outdoor performances should be treated like demonstrations, religious gatherings

An oversight body for San Francisco’s mental health programs may be restructured after questions were raised about its management and lack of effectiveness. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Behavioral health oversight body looks for new start — and staff — after mismanagement

Members of an oversight body for San Francisco’s behavioral health programs said… Continue reading

The City requires the recycling or reuse of debris material removed from a construction project site. <ins>(Emma Chiang/Special to S.F. Examiner)</ins>
<ins></ins>
Permits proposed for haulers of construction debris to achieve zero-waste

San Francisco plans to tighten regulations on the disposal of construction and… Continue reading

Most Read