Infant triplet found dead in S.F.

A four-month-old baby was found dead in her mother’s apartment on Sunday morning, according to neighbors and the police.</p>

Authorities said the death appeared to be natural but the police department’s homicide unit was investigating to rule out unnatural causes.

“It seems like it may be medical but we are not sure,” police spokesman Sgt. Steve Mannina said. “The department wants to err on the side of caution.”

The family of the girl called police to a housing project in the 2500 block of Sutter St. at 7 a.m. on Sunday, according to Mannina. Neighbors said the baby girl was a triplet and the mother was pregnant with another child. The San Francisco Medical Examiner’s office, which removed the body from the apartment, said it could not release the name of the baby girl or the family because of the sensitivity of the investigation.

Neighbors said they saw several people taken from the house by authorities for questioning. Authorities would not confirm that family members were questioned but said the investigation is extensive and every precaution is being taken.

“It hasn’t been deemed a homicide. No suspects have been identified, no suspects have been arrested,” Mannina said. “I think [the investigators just wanted to make sure that all possibilities had been exhausted before they determined anything.”

Mannina said authorities would know more once an autopsy is completed on the infant. The medical examiner said it could not comment on the investigation.

Shocked neighbors said the girl seemed to be happy and normal when she was seen around the housing complex with her family.

“Everyone knows [the family] but nobody knows them that great,” said a neighbor who identified herself only as Elaine. “We would see them around and they were cute kids.”

sfarooq@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsLocal

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