Incumbents keep seats on Burlingame city council

Councilwoman and Mayor Terry Nagel

Councilwoman and Mayor Terry Nagel

Voters decided to stick with familiar faces after the votes were counted Tuesday for two seats on the City Council.
Councilwoman and Mayor Terry Nagel won her third term while Councilman Jerry Deal nabbed a second term, with both candidates running on their records of achievement.

Meanwhile, newcomer Ricardo Ortiz, who said he decided to run after watching three months of debate over whether to save an old eucalyptus tree dubbed “Tom,” came in third.

Nagel described the city as being in “good hands” with healthy reserves, new business, low crime rates and stable property values compared to other Peninsula cities.

High-speed rail being a big issue in Burlingame, Nagel said she is not opposed to the rail, but is not in favor of the proposed aerial design.

Deal, however, believes the proposal is a boondoggle as currently conceived, and will bankrupt the state and drain all available money for other transportation projects.

Ortiz said he unequivocally opposes high-speed rail in his city.

Nagel favors development in which the city builds more apartments close to downtown amenities.

Deal said he wanted to make Burlingame more business-friendly. During his first term, Deal established a new system where developers can meet with city officials to review plans before any large investments are made.

Meanwhile, Ortiz said he hoped to bring common sense back to the council. The bank branch manager said the city had no place asking local stores to put health warning labels on cellphones, and he called ongoing discussions about banning leaf blowers “a waste of time.”

He criticized the mayor for her alleged “indecisiveness” about the eucalyptus and “wishy-washiness” on high-speed rail.

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