Hunters View tenants shocked by new “house rules” for housing complex

Mike Koozmin/The S.F. ExaminerNew beginning: The Hunters View housing complex is part of a project to replace substandard public housing.

Mike Koozmin/The S.F. ExaminerNew beginning: The Hunters View housing complex is part of a project to replace substandard public housing.

Community advocates in Hunters Point are crying foul over paternalistic new rules that public housing tenants must live by if they want to move into the new units replacing the Hunters View housing complex.

The 31 pages of “house rules” (see below) regulate everything from guests, smoking and barbecues to festive decorations and shopping carts. Even after the rules were scaled back amid tenant concerns, they are still causing alarm, with move-ins scheduled to begin next month.

#link_box { width: 150px; height: auto; margin: 0; padding: 0; margin: 10px 20px 10px 0px; padding: 10px; background-color: #fbfade; /* ecru – light yellow */ border: 1px solid #343a25; /* green – for summer arts */ float: left; font-family: arial, sans serif; font-size: 11px; } #link_box img, #link_box a { border 0px; border-style: none; outline: none; } #link_box h1 { margin: 0; padding: 5px; border-bottom: 1px solid #ddd; text-transform: none; color: #8A0808; font-family: arial, sans serif; font-weight: bold; font-size: 15px; text-align: center; } #link_box h2 { margin: 0; padding: 5px; border-bottom: 1px solid #ddd; text-transform: none; color: #000; font-family: arial, sans serif; font-weight: bold; font-size: 10px; text-align: center; } #link_box ul { list-style: none; margin: 0; padding: 0; border: none; } #link_box li { margin: 0px padding: 0px; border-bottom: 1px solid #ddd; border-bottom-width: 1px; } #link_box li a { display: block; padding: 5px 5px 5px 15px; /* Padding for bullet */ /* border-bottom: 1px solid #ddd; border-bottom-width: 1px; */ color: #000; width: 100%; width: auto; /* height: auto; */ /* border: 1px solid blue; */ margin: 0px; font-family: arial, sans serif; font-size: 11px; line-height: 14px; text-decoration: none; } #link_box li a: before { /* background-position: top left; */ } #link_box li a:hover { background-color: #ddd; color: #000; }

For instance, a lengthy section on bedbugs requires tenants to let the housing manager “inspect all luggage, bedding, clothing, and personal property which tenant intends to maintain in the unit or store anywhere in the development premises.” A related rule states that if signs of the blood-sucking pests are detected, the “tenant shall bathe, and after bathing, only wear clothes that have been laundered as required by the eradication process.”

“They wouldn’t dare tell white people when to bathe, would they?” complained Tessie Ester, head of the Hunters View tenants’ association. “I am a grandmother. Don’t treat me like a child.”

Other rules ban barbecues, loitering, outdoor drinking, medical marijuana and giving keys to house guests, who may visit only as permitted by the lease.

The rules, some of which mirror state laws or existing public housing rules, were presented Tuesday by a representative of the John Stewart Co. during a community meeting. The developer is rebuilding the Hunters View public housing complex under San Francisco’s ambitious Hope SF program. The program was launched in 2007 to rebuild eight poorly maintained and crime-plagued public housing sites with one-to-one replacement of public housing units and a combination of additional affordable and market-rate housing.

Ester said prospective tenants are upset over the rules and don’t want to sign them, but fear the consequences.

“We find this discrimination,” Ester said. “Nobody has rules like these.”

But Jack Gardner, president of John Stewart Co. called the rules “pretty standard” and said they plan to manage the “market-rate quality” units in a “highly professional way.”

“There is nothing discriminatory about any of the housing rules,” Gardner said. But he allowed there was time to make some changes.

“We’re open to their suggestions and comments,” Gardner said.

Tenants should begin occupying the first 25 units in mid-December. Eighty-two more are expected to be completed in May 2013. This initial phase cost $75 million, paid for by a combination of state, federal, city and private investment.

Meanwhile other public housing rebuilds are moving forward. Last month. Mayor Ed Lee celebrated the receipt of $600,000 in federal funding to help rebuild two other public housing sites, the 785-unit Sunnydale public housing complex and the 606-unit Potrero site. At the time, Lee called Hope SF “a bold step” that will “transform our city’s most distressed public housing sites into thriving communities.”

And that is how Gardner sees it.

“Tenants are psyched to get into them,” he said of the units.

jsabatini@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsGovernment & PoliticsHOPE SFHunter's PointLocalPolitics

Just Posted

Pharmacist Hank Chen is known for providing personalized service at Charlie’s Pharmacy in the Fillmore.<ins> (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
Left: A Walgreens at 300 Gough St. is among San Francisco stores closing.
Walgreens closures open the door for San Francisco’s neighborhood pharmacies

‘I think you’ll see more independents start to pop up’

San Franciscans are likely to have the opportunity to vote in four different elections in 2022. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Electionpalooza: SF school board recall will kick off a flurry of local races

‘It’s going to be a lot of elections and a lot of decisions for voters to make’

Four young politicos were elected to city government on the Peninsula in 2020. From left: Redwood City Councilmember Michael Smith; South San Francisco Councilmember James Coleman; Redwood City Councilmember Lissette Espinoza-Garnica; and East Palo Alto Councilmember Antonio Lopez.<ins> (Examiner illustration/Courtesy photos)</ins>
Progressive politicians rise to power on the Peninsula. Will redistricting reverse the trend?

‘There’s this wave of young people really trying to shake things up’

The Walgreens at 4645 Mission St. in The City is among those slated to close. <ins>(Courtesy photo)</ins>
Walgreens says it’s closing five San Francisco stores due to crime. Where’s the data?

Walgreens should be transparent, enlighten San Francisco leaders about crime’s effect on business

Most Read