Humps placed on back burner

South San Francisco — A group of homeowners who have lobbied for two years to have speed humps installed on their street to force drivers to slow down were dealt another setback Tuesday.

Yielding to requests by South San Francisco City Council members, who asked that the request be denied, the county Board of Supervisors deferred installing four speed humps on Alta Vista Drive in unincorporated South City, as recommended by the county Public Works Department. Instead, supervisors proposed splitting the cost of two solar powered radar speed signs that will flash drivers on the street their speed with South City. Supervisors also asked that South City police step up their enforcement on the street, which technically falls into the California Highway Patrol’s jurisdiction.

Richard Para, an Alta Vista resident for about eight years, was unhappy with the decision. “Anythingthat is unsupervised, like speed signs, isn’t going to do any good because drivers will adjust to it,” Para said. A physical means is needed to enforce the speed limit, he said.

South San Francisco Mayor Joe Fernekes said the council’s request to scuttle the speed humps was the result of complaints from city residents worried the humps would divert traffic onto their nearby street. South City has a blanket policy prohibiting speed humps within city limits.

Fernekes said he supports installing the radar signs, but said he doesn’t think South San Francisco should pay half the bill. He also balked at having city police patrol an area assigned to the CHP. “I think the issue is a county issue and they should be taking care of it,” Fernekes said.

The proposal to split the cost of the radar and speed signs is estimated to cost about $6,000, half what it would cost to install four speed humps, officials said. The South San Francisco Council will weigh the plan at the end of November, Fernekes said.

ecarpenter@examiner.comBay Area NewsLocal

Just Posted

Cabernet sauvignon grapes sat in a container after being crushed at Smith-Madrone Winery in St. Helena. (Courtesy Smith-Madrone Winery)
San Francisco’s ‘Champagne problems’ — Wine industry suffers supply chain woes

‘Everywhere you turn, things that were easy are no longer easy’

Glasses behind the bar at LUNA in the Mission District on Friday, Oct. 15, 2021. Glassware is just one of the many things restaurants have had trouble keeping in stock as supply chain problems ripple outward. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
SF restaurants face product shortages and skyrocketing costs

‘The supply chain crisis has impacted us in almost every way imaginable’

A Giants fans hangs his head in disbelief after the Dodgers won the NLDS in a controversial finish to a tight Game 5. (Chris Victorio/Special to The Examiner)
Giants dream season ends at the hands of the Dodgers, 2-1

A masterful game comes down to the bottom of the ninth, and San Francisco came up short

<strong>Workers with Urban Alchemy and the Downtown Streets Team clean at Seventh and Market streets on Oct. 12. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins> </strong>
<ins></ins>
Why is it so hard to keep San Francisco’s streets clean?

Some blame bureaucracy, others say it’s the residents’ fault

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi — seen in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday — touted Congressional Democrats’ infrastructure bill in San Francisco on Thursday. (Stefani Reynolds/The New York Times)
Pelosi touts infrastructure bill as it nears finish line

Climate change, social safety net among major priorities of Democrats’ 10-year funding measure

Most Read