Human Rights Campaign moving into Milk’s former HQ

The Human Rights Campaign, the nation’s largest lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender civil rights organization, is moving its San Francisco Action Center and store to the historic home of civil rights legend Harvey Milk. The new location is the former home of Milk’s Castro Camera, the location where the legendary supervisor worked, lived and organized the political campaigns that eventually got him elected as the first openly gay man to the San Francisco Board of Supervisors.

“It is Harvey Milk’s vision of hope that continues to inspire the work that we do at the Human Rights Campaign,” said HRC President Joe Solmonese. “We are the beneficiaries of his groundbreaking activism and are honored to be a part of the future that he envisioned.”

In addition to merchandise with HRC’s signature “equal” logo, the store will offer items emblazoned with the words and images of Harvey Milk. A portion of the proceeds from the sale of these items will be donated to local organizations that continue to carry on the legacy of Harvey Milk, such as the Harvey Milk Civil Rights Academy and the GLBT Historical Society, according to the organization.

The HRC Action Center and store will move into the new location at 575 Castro St. with a soft opening in January of next year, and hold its grand opening in May of 2011 in conjunction with Harvey Milk Day holiday activities. During the move, HRC will work to preserve a mural dedicated to Milk from the previous tenants, and work alongside the GLBT Historical Society to create a new photo mural of Milk within the store.

esherbert@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsGovernment & PoliticsHarvey MilkPoliticsSan FranciscoUnder the Dome

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