The numbers show nearly 14 percent of San Francisco voters who participated in the Sept. 14 recall election wanted to oust Gov. Gavin Newsom from elected office. (Shutterstock photo)
(Shutterstock photo)

The numbers show nearly 14 percent of San Francisco voters who participated in the Sept. 14 recall election wanted to oust Gov. Gavin Newsom from elected office. (Shutterstock photo) (Shutterstock photo)

How San Francisco neighborhoods voted in the Newsom recall

Sunset tops the list as the area with the most ‘yes’ votes

Gov. Gavin Newsom could always count on his hometown to help him survive the recall.

But San Francisco isn’t a monolith, even when it comes to choosing between a Democrat and the likes of conservative talk show host Larry Elder.

Just take a look at the latest tally of election results released Monday by the Department of Elections.

The numbers show nearly 14 percent of San Francisco voters who participated in the Sept. 14 recall election wanted to oust their former mayor from elected office. The recall picked up 46,453 “yes” votes out of the 335,522 ballots counted so far.

While the numbers may surprise some given San Francisco’s reputation for pushing the limits of progressivism, there are nearly 34,000 registered Republicans in The City, and another 138,000 residents with no party preference. Even Donald Trump racked up 37,000 votes here in November 2016.

The Examiner decided to take a closer look at the data from the recall to get a better sense of who went to bed disappointed on election night.

A neighborhood breakdown of the data shows they live in large numbers on The City’s sleepy west side, in the Sunset and Richmond districts, as well as in ritzier parts of town like West of Twin Peaks, the Marina and Pacific Heights.

While every neighborhood rejected the recall by a large margin, the Sunset had more “yes” votes than any other, with 6,382 residents supporting the recall or nearly 21 percent of the suburb. But the neighborhood with the greatest percent of recall supporters ended up being Sunset-adjacent Lake Merced, where 1,137 voters, or more than 23 percent of the area, chose to kick Newsom out of the governor’s office.

On the other side of things, only 512 voters living in Haight-Ashbury backed the recall. Just 5 percent of the progressive neighborhood supported the recall — the smallest portion of “yes” votes for any neighborhood in San Francisco.

These numbers aren’t final. Elections officials still have an estimated 4,600 ballots to count as of Monday, and are expected to release new tallies every weekday at 4 p.m. until all votes are counted. So far, it looks like 67 percent of registered voters participated in the election.

BY THE NUMBERS

San Francisco neighborhoods with the most votes to oust Gavin Newsom so far:

Sunset

“Yes” votes: 6,382

Total votes: 30,687

Percent “yes”: 21%

West of Twin Peaks

“Yes” votes: 4,665

Total votes: 27,492

Percent “yes” votes: 17%

Marina/Pacific Heights

“Yes” votes: 4,403

Total votes: 27,015

Percent “yes’” 16%

Richmond

“Yes” votes: 4,286

Total votes: 26,513

Percent “yes”: 16%

Excelsior

“Yes” votes: 3,400

Total votes: 18,427

Percent “yes” votes: 18%

Source: San Francisco Department of Elections, Preliminary District Statement of the Vote – 9

mbarba@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsPoliticssan francisco news

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