Homes in the Excelsior neighborhood of San Francisco, Calif. are seen on a hillside January 27, 2012. (Jessica Christian/2012 S.F. Examiner)

Homes in the Excelsior neighborhood of San Francisco, Calif. are seen on a hillside January 27, 2012. (Jessica Christian/2012 S.F. Examiner)

Housing boom arrives in SF’s Excelsior

A housing boom has come to the quiet Excelsior neighborhood.

New numbers from the San Francisco Planning Department show that more than 900 units of housing are in the pipeline between the Excelsior and its neighboring districts.

The figures show that 509 market-rate units and 399 below-market rate units are coming to the neighborhood of mostly single-family homes.

The numbers stirred concern at the Planning Commission meeting Thursday that the Excelsior could become the next Mission District, where once-immigrant dense corridors are now home to high-priced restaurants and bars.

“The Excelsior has been arrived, it’s been discovered,” said Planning Commissioner Dennis Richards. “This is the Excelsior, a working class neighborhood. It shouldn’t be Noe Valley, a feeding frenzy.”

Richards said the housing market in the neighborhood is such that homes are selling beyond asking price.

Gilbert Williams of the Alliance of Californians for Community Empowerment Action, a social justice advocacy group for low-income residents, said he is concerned about displacement of Latinos and blacks from San Francisco.

“All I have to do is look to the Mission District and see what has happened to that community,” Williams said, asking the commission to not upzone the Outer Mission corridor.

But Planning Commissioner Kristin Moore said it’s not too late for the Excelsior to prepare for change like the Mission, where the community responded to “an extremely difficult situation that was really close to the Titanic sinking.”

“Reaction is in the Mission, the Outer Mission still has the ability to look ahead, shape and participate,” Moore said.Planning

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

San Francisco Police Chief Bill Scott leaves the scene of an officer-involved shooting at Brannan Street and Jack London Alley in the South Park area on Friday, May 7, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Chief Scott issues rare apology to man shot by SF police

Officer says he ‘did not intend for his firearm to go off’

Despite the pandemic, San Francisco has ended the fiscal year with a budget surplus. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Better than expected tax revenues leave city with $157.3M surplus for this year

As the fiscal year nears an end and Mayor London Breed prepares… Continue reading

Passengers board a BART train bound for the San Francisco Airport at Powell Street station. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
BART bumps up service restoration to August 30, offers fare discounts

Rail agency breaks pandemic ridership records, prepares to welcome more passengers

Ashley and Michelle Monterrosa hold a photo of their brother Sean Monterrosa, who was killed by a Vallejo police officer early Tuesday morning, as they are comforted at a memorial rally at the 24th Street Mission BART plaza on Friday, June 5, 2020. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
State Department of Justice to investigate Sean Monterrosa shooting by Vallejo police

Attorney General Rob Bonta steps in after Solano County DA declines case

Gov. Gavin Newsom, show here speaking at the City College of San Francisco mass vaccination site in April, faces a recall election due to anger on the right over his handling of the pandemic, among other issues. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Why Gavin Newsom’s popularity could work against him in the recall election

Top pollster: ‘We’re not seeing the Democrats engaged in this election. And that may be a problem…’

Most Read