Marcio Jose Sanchez/ap file photoThree people were killed when an Asiana Airlines plane crashed at San Francisco International Airport on July 6.

Marcio Jose Sanchez/ap file photoThree people were killed when an Asiana Airlines plane crashed at San Francisco International Airport on July 6.

Hospital releases last patient from Asiana crash

The last patient who was still hospitalized following the Asiana Airlines plane crash at San Francisco International Airport in July has been released, San Francisco General Hospital officials announced Wednesday.

The female patient, whose name has not been released, was transferred to a rehabilitation facility in good condition Tuesday after suffering life-threatening injuries in the July 6 crash, according to the hospital.

She was treated for a paralyzing spinal cord injury, road burns over 30 percent of her body and intestinal wounds that prevented her from ingesting solid food for two months, hospital officials said.

The patient underwent about 30 surgical procedures during her 15-week stay at the hospital.

“This hospital saved her life,” said Dr. Margaret Knudson, the hospital's chief of surgery, who performed 21 of the procedures.

“She's one of the sickest patients I've ever cared for in my career. Our whole team breathed a big sigh of relief when she left. Not that we're glad that she's gone of course, but we're glad that she made it,” Knudson said.

San Francisco General Hospital treated a total of 67 patients from the Boeing 777 plane, which had departed Incheon, South Korea, and struck a seawall while trying to land in San Francisco, causing the tail section to separate from the rest of the aircraft.

Three girls died in the crash and its aftermath, and more than 180 passengers were injured.

Asiana AirlinesBay Area NewsSan Francisco General HospitalSan Francisco International Airport

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