Hopefuls raise financial stakes for supervisorial races

One candidate already has $100K in campaign funds

With one candidate already topping $100,000 in money raised for the Board of Supervisors election in November, new campaign finance statements paint a portrait of at least two hotly contested races this fall.

Dozens of political hopefuls have officially announced they are running for one of five supervisorial seats — from The City’s even-numbered districts — that are up for grabs. However, only seven have raised more than $5,000, a fundraising bar that requires candidates to submit an electronic listing of all their campaign contributors.

Taking an unexpected lead in fundraising for the Nov. 7 election is Jaynry Mak, a former legislative aide to Supervisor Fiona Ma. Mak is hoping to fill the seat her former boss will vacate when Ma runs as the Democratic candidate for the 12th Assembly District. After officially declaring her candidacy on June 9, Mak raised $100,695 in the subsequent three weeks that led up the June 30 semiannual finance statement deadline.

“She’s crashed the party with kegs,” San Francisco political analyst David Latterman said. “I suspect the other candidates are surprised about this. It serves notice that she’s a serious candidate.”

Although eight candidates have filed to run for District 4 supervisor, until Mak entered the race political pundits were placing their bets on San Francisco lawyer Doug Chan, a former police commissioner who has the endorsement of Mayor Gavin Newsom. Chan has raised $64,294 in the past six months. Ma has endorsed both candidates.

“You can’t buy experience,” said Chan, who has served on city commissions for four different administrations. “I expect we’ll have sufficient funds to explain my breadth and depth of experience.”

Another closely watched contest is the one between District 6 Supervisor Chris Daly and challenger Rob Black, who in the last six months have raised $55,501 and $26,509, respectively.

Daly is a former housing organizer who focuses on representing predominantly low-income constituents in his district, much to the chagrin of the business interests also present there. Black, who has the endorsement of Newsom, is likely to tap into the business community for support, although Latterman said that in the end, the ability of each candidate to court individual votes will be more important than fundraising.

“This will be a street battle to get out the vote,” Latterman said.

It remains to be seenwhether a strong fight will be waged for the District 8 seat. Incumbent Bevan Dufty has raised $36,746 — with no contributors going over his self-imposed $100 limit per person, even though $500 is the maximum allowed.

The declared candidacy in June of Alix Rosenthal, a deputy city attorney in Oakland, created a stir among those who believe she would be a more progressive alternative to Dufty. Although she has raised less than $1,000 in the weeks since, Rosenthal said her campaign has now “kicked fundraising into high gear.”

Seemingly secure in their legislative seats, District 10 Supervisor Sophie Maxwell and District 2 Supervisor Michela Alioto-Pier have both built sizable campaign chests since January, $84,400 and $70,791, respectively.

beslinger@examiner.comBay Area NewsGovernment & PoliticsLocalPolitics

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