(Mike Koozmin/S.F. Examiner file photo)

Homeless outreach boosted in SF amid major storm

The storm of the century has cleared San Francisco's homeless population off of the streets and into shelters that opened just for the occasion, officials said Thursday.

Churches and homeless shelters that normally close for the day early in the morning were open around-the-clock as the much-hyped rainstorm rolled across the Bay Area.

The City's homeless outreach teams were on call throughout the day, directing any people left on the streets to church basements, neighborhood homeless shelters and other indoor dry spaces offered for the duration of the storm.

About 200 people were huddled in St. Boniface Church in the Tenderloin, and nearby St. Anthony's Dining Room was expecting to serve hot meals to as many as 3,000 people, spokesman Karl Robillard said.

There are over 6,400 people sleeping on streets or in homeless shelters on any given night in San Francisco, and only 1,139 shelter beds to serve them.

About 1,000 of The City's homeless are youths, and with San Francisco Unified School District closed for the day, places like the First Friendship Church on Steiner Street was offering space for families with no place to go.

Homeless outreach teams were also out in force Wednesday, informing people of the increased availability for shelter and services during bad weather.

The message seemed to get out.

Before the storm Wednesday night, streets typically full of people were nearly empty, said Bevan Dufty, the Mayor's Office homeless czar.

“And when the rains came, that led any last recalcitrants to finally come inside,” he said.

Some homeless folks did choose to stay outside for the storm, though not without shelter.

The tent city on Division Street underneath the U.S. Highway 101-Interstate 80 overpass was in place Wednesday night, Dufty said.

Bay Area NewsBay Area stormSan Francisco stormweather

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

The admissions process at the academically competitive Lowell High School is set to change this year due to coronavirus restritions. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Lowell’s selective admissions process put on hold this year — and more changes may be in the works

School board votes unanimously to use normal student assignment lottery for competitive school

Dr. Vincent Matthews, superintendent of the San Francisco Unified School District, said Tuesday that student would not be back in school before the end of this calendar year. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Superintendent: City schools will not reopen before the end of the year

San Francisco public schools won’t reopen to students for the rest of… Continue reading

San Francisco will allow bars selling drinks, and not food, to begin serving customers outdoors under health guidelines going into effect next month. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
SF becomes first Bay Area County to move to least restrictive COVID-19 category

Change to ‘yellow’ will allow more indoor dining and fitness, reopening non-essential offices

City officials want to install more red light cameras but the process is costly and time consuming. (Shutterstock)
Transit officials push for more red light cameras

SFMTA says ‘capital crunch’ and dragging timelines make expanding the program cumbersome

Police release an image a cracked windshield on a Prius that Cesar Vargas allegedly tried to carjack. Vargas, who was shot by police a short time later, can be seen in videos jumping on the windshield and pushing a Muni passenger who disembarked from a bus. (Courtesy SFPD
SFPD releases videos of deadly police shooting

Cesar Vargas killed after reports of carjacking with knife

Most Read