Holidays still mean home

For Anthony LaRocca, Thanksgiving means the 415 versus the 650.

LaRocca, a 24-year-old electrician, sits down to a nice Thanksgiving dinner with his family on Second Avenue, but only after he and his friends have settled their differences.

“Usually every year, my buddies and I, about 20 of us, get together and play football in the Sunset — the 415 versus the 650,” LaRocca said, referring to The City’s area code and San Mateo County’s. “And then I’m going to eat dinner with the family.”

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, despite all of today’s distractions, food, drink and family still are the main Thanksgiving-

weekend draws for Americans.

Of participants surveyed between 2003 and 2006, 97.6 percent of Americans said they ate and drank as an activity during the holiday weekend, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

While only 17.3 percent played a sport over the weekend, when they did play, they spent just under three hours daily breaking a sweat, according to the data.

The second-most popular activity: watching television. Nearly 85 percent of Americans flipped on the boob tube over the Thanksgiving weekend for an average of 3.66 hours a day.

More and more households in the San Francisco Bay Area have multiple television sets going, with a common division of sports on one, cooking-oriented shows on another and children’s programming on another, Comcast’s Andrew Johnson said.

“It’s not your typical Thursday, that’s for sure,” Johnson said.

But not all of Thanksgiving-

weekend revelry is mashed sweet potatoes and gravy draped over turkey and stuffing. Mikhail Ryvkin, 57, works in the Quality Shoe Repair shop on Mission Street. He said he would take Thanksgiving Day off but head back to work Friday.

“Too much holiday days for small business is not OK,” he said.

dsmith@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsLocal

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