Highway 1 Improvement Project gets under way

Street widening, bike lanes, undergrounding for area already beset by traffic headaches

HALF MOON BAY — Officials broke ground Thursday on the long-awaited Highway 1 Improvement Project, but delays from the construction may cause some grumpiness among residents running on fumes after the recent closure of Devil’s Slide.

The $21.8 million, two-year project will ultimately improve traffic flow in and around the Highway 1 and state Route 92 intersection, often plagued by backups.

But the construction will take some getting used to because people are “tired of traffic,” said Charise McHugh, the Half Moon Bay-Coastside Chamber of Commerce president.

Tree-trimming on 92 has slowed traffic recently just as people were getting over the four-month Devil’s Slide closure, which forced nearly all commuter traffic for the area ontoHighway 92, she said.

“It’s sort of one traffic hazard after another,” McHugh said, noting that improved access to the coast will be good for residents and businesses. “It needs to be done and once it’s done it will be fabulous.”

The project will redesign 92’s intersections with Half Moon Bay’s Main Street and Highway 1 — intersections that are less than 250 yards apart — to improve flow and safety for cars, bikes and pedestrians.

Crews will widen 92 between Main Street and Highway 1 from two lanes to four lanes, and bike lanes and sidewalks will be constructed on northbound Main Street coming up to 92.

Overhead utilities will also be moved underground and more aesthetic street-lighting and landscaping will be installed.

Southbound Highway 1 commuters will get a second left-hand turn lane when turning onto 92, an intersection that needed help from Half Moon Bay police during the Devil’s Slide reconstruction to help alleviate traffic congestion.

Bill Carlson, the construction manager for Half Moon Bay, said crews would start in two to three weeks on the Main Street portion of the project to give Caltrans and PG&E crews time to finish the tree-trimming. Officials estimate the widening will be done by winter 2008.

Of the $21.8 million needed for the project, the San Mateo County Transportation Authority will contribute $12.6 million from Measure A funds, a 20-year half-cent sales tax that has brought in more than $138 million for city and county roads, and Half Moon Bay will pay $3.4 million.

dsmith@examiner.comBay Area NewsLocal

Just Posted

Pregnant women are in the high-risk category currently prioritized for booster shots in San Francisco. (Unai Huizi/Shutterstock)
What pregnant women need to know about COVID and booster shots

Inoculations for immunosuppressed individuals are recommended in the second trimester

Examiner reporter Ben Schneider drives an Arcimoto Fun Utility Vehicle along Beach Street in Fisherman’s Wharf on Tuesday, Oct. 19, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
Could San Francisco’s tiny tourist cruisers become the cars of the future?

‘Fun Utility Vehicles’ have arrived in The City

The Science Hall at the City College of San Francisco Ocean campus is pictured on Jan. 14. The Democrats’ Build Back Better bill would enable free community college nationwide, but CCSF is already tuition-free for all San Francisco residents. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
What Biden’s Build Back Better bill would mean for San Franciscans

Not much compared to other places — because The City already provides several key features

A directional sign at Google in Mountain View, Calif., on Oct. 20, 2020. Workers at Google and Amazon are demanding their companies pull out of Project Nimbus, a $1.2 billion contract to provide cloud services for the Israeli military and government. (Laura Morton/The New York Times)
Google and Amazon employees criticize $1.2 billion cloud services contract with Israel

‘We can create a world in which tech companies can thrive without doing harm’

Most Read