High-rise designed for seniors may be built on Van Ness

An 80-foot building intended for seniors has been proposed for Van Ness Avenue, pending approval by The City.

The $17.4 million development will replace the two-story building that presently houses Kinko’s at the corner of Van Ness Avenue and Clay Street, and will include 62 for-sale housing units dedicated to seniors, 5,100 square feet of commercial space and a basement level with 82 parking spaces.

According to Sunrise Development, the firm proposing the project, the eight-story building will also include seven below-market-rate housing units.

“We have no known neighborhood opposition to the plan,” said Jared Eigerman, the attorney representing Sunrise.

Eigerman said the building could take up to 18 months to construct, and that the only problem with acquiring The City’s approval has been about a proposed loading area for deliveries.

Sunrise is proposing the trucks pull in from Clay Street and pull out on Washington Street, while The City wants them to incorporate the space underground — which could mean less parking and “big bucks,” Eigerman said.

City planner Glenn Cabreros said The City’s planning code requires that the spaces Sunrise is proposing for a loading dock be kept open.

Jordanna Thigpen, president of the San Francisco Small Business Commission, hopes that The City and the development firm take proper precautions before approving the project.

“I’m concerned about the potential loss of Kinko’s,” said Thigpen, who often uses the Kinko’s to Fed-Ex packages for her Marina business.

“I hope [the development firm] will take the concerns of the community into account and also respect the fact that many small-business owners can’t afford to pay high rents. They should, hopefully, be encouraging the growth of small businesses in San Francisco.”

If Sunrise and the Planning Commission reach an agreement at today’s 1:30 p.m. session, a public hearing must be held to make sure there is no contest for the removal of two trees during the demolishing of the old structure. After that, the Department of Building Inspection must approve more of the structure’s details in order to issue a building permit.

If the petition is denied, Sunrise development may issue an appeal to the Board of Supervisors or wait another year to reapply.

eeconomides@examiner.com

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