High-density project for Daly City

One of the biggest volunteer-built affordable-housing projects on the Peninsula is expected to be the newest addition to Daly City’s Mission Street, according to Peninsula Habitat for Humanity, a nonprofit that builds affordable homes for low-income families.

The organization is planning to build a high-density, 36-condominium building at 7555 Mission St. to help alleviate the Daly City’s need for affordable housing.

“This is something that Daly City welcomes,” Councilmember Maggie Gomez said. “It helps the need for affordable housing. In this town, it’s such a great need. We have working-class people where families need to work two jobs and they are barely making it.”

The three-story building, located on 0.67 acres of city-owned land that is now occupied by Hertz Rent A Car, requires an amendment to the general city plan to change the lot to high-density, an issue that will be considered by the Planning Commission tonight.

Associate planner Jeanne Naughton said she expects the amendment to be approved.

The project consists of three connected buildings with 34 three-bedroom condos and two two-bedroom condos as well as a 13,000-square-foot front yard. The disabled-adaptable condominiums will be built atop a 57-spot garage and will have solar panels on the roof.

According to a projection made by the Association of Bay Area Governments, there are 1,391 housing units needed in Daly City. The subsidized condos will be offered to low- and very low-income families for $195,000 to $300,000. They will received a zero-interest-rate mortgage andwill be able to sell their house back to Peninsula Habitat for Humanity.

“This affords them the opportunity to buy a market-rate home,” the organization’s Executive Director Mary Boughton said.

Boughton said that this project would fit well with the plans to make El Camino Real, which turns into Mission Street in Daly City, an important county boulevard.

“This project is a poster child for what the task force is looking for — bringing beautiful projects to El Camino and keep people in the restaurants, shopping and near transportation,” she said.

As with other Habitat for Humanity projects, the Daly City development will be built by volunteers.

svasilyuk@examiner.com

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