Heat wave won’t bring blackouts

Despite high temperatures, San Francisco is expected to avoid the type of blackouts it had in the summer of 2006.

In San Francisco, heat-related electrical use hasn't been enough to cause outages, according to Suzanne Gautier, a spokeswoman for the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission.

While much of the Bay Area has scorched, San Francisco’s temperatures have remained in the 70s and 80s, according to Diana Henderson, meteorologist with the National Weather Service.

Also, other parts of the state are staying cool, which helps with the power usage.

California's electric use topped out at 50,072 megawatts on July 24, 2006 — enough to cause blackouts. Today’s peak is forecasted at 46,712, California ISO spokesman Gregg Fishman said.

California ISO issued alerts this week asking Californians to cut back on electrical use, particularly during the afternoon when residents are most tempted to crank up the air conditioning. Instead, the agency — which operates much of California’s wholesale power grid — recommended that people keep cool with fans and by drawing the drapes.

Temperatures throughout the Bay Area should begin cooling on Friday, and locals can expect to see fog by Saturday, according to Henderson.

bwinegarner@sfexaminer.com

Life by numbers

Today’s expected high temperature in San Francisco: 77

Today’s expected high temperature in Redwood City: 90

Record high for this date in San Francisco (1959): 92

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