Health officials to begin taking waiver applications from elementary schools

Health officials to begin taking waiver applications from elementary schools

53 schools have indicated interest in in-person teaching so far

San Francisco health officials will begin distributing waiver applications next week for elementary schools hoping to teach classes in person.

As of Friday, 53 San Francisco schools have told the Department of Public Health they want to apply for those waivers. Three of those are charter schools, 13 are parochial, and 37 are private schools.

If approved, that would bring 9,679 students and 1,672 staff back to 67 locations, city officials said.

SFUSD is not included in the schools that have applied. The district began distance learning earlier this month and has said it will bring students back to campus in phases once it is deemed safe.

San Francisco is still on California’s coronavirus watch list, limiting the types of reopenings allowed, with an average of 8.6 new cases per day per 100,000 residents. The goal is 1.8 cases per day per 100,000.

The announcement comes as the Department of Children, Youth and Their Families began accepting focused applications this week to bring eligible children into “community hubs.” Various nonprofits from 826 Valencia to Jamestown Community Center have reached out to low-income families, public housing or Single Room Occupancy residents, homeless youth, foster youth, and English learners for the first phase invites.

Ultimately, DCYF plans to bring in 2,000 of those students for an extended-summer camp type of day to assist with remote learning across 70 sites by Sept. 14. The next phase would expand to 2,000 students and another 2,000 for the third phase, DCYF Executive Director told the Board of Education on Tuesday.

“Schools, community hubs and after-school programs provide a critical source of support for children, youth, and their families, and helped mitigate socio-economic disparities through school meal programs and social, physical, behavioral, and mental health services,” Mayor London Breed’s office said in a statement. “Therefore, returning children to learning environments, whether it is a classroom, a community hub, or after school program, remains a top priority for the City.”

Joshua Sabatini contributed to this report.

Bay Area NewsCoronaviruseducationsan francisco news

Just Posted

Niners quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo led a late-game comeback against the Packers, but San Francisco lost, 30-28, on a late field goal. (Courtesy of San Francisco 49ers)
The Packers beat the Niners in a heartbreaker: Don’t panic

San Francisco is no better and no worse than you thought they were.

Dominion Voting Systems, a Denver-based vendor, is under contract to supply voting machines for elections in San Francisco. (Kevin N. Hume/Examiner file)
Is San Francisco’s elections director impeding voting machine progress?

Open source technology could break up existing monopoly

Health experts praised Salesforce for keeping its Dreamforce conference at Moscone Center outdoors and on a small scale. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
Happy birthday, Marc Benioff. Your company did the right thing

Salesforce kept Dreamforce small, which made all kinds of sense

Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers proved to be too much for the Niners in a Week 3 loss to Green Bay. It was San Francisco’s home opener for the 2021 season. (Courtesy of the San Francisco 49ers.)
Week 3 NFL roundup: Packers victory over 49ers caps off a stellar Sunday

By Tyler Dunne New York Times Here’s the Week 3 roundup of… Continue reading

Former San Francisco Mayor Willie Brown, pictured with Rose Pak in 2014, says the late Chinatown activist was “helping to guide the community away from the divisions, politically.”
Willie and Rose: How an alliance for the ages shaped SF

How the Mayor and Chinatown activist shaped San Francisco, then and now

Most Read