Halloween in the Castro? S.F. says: Don’t go there

To prevent throngs from showing up for Halloween festivities in the Castro this year, The City will try a simple approach: Tell people the violence-marred event has been canceled and to go elsewhere.

But those warnings may not be enough to keep visitors away from the neighborhood that has annually hosted a major street party. To prepare for that, The City plans to have at the site more than the 500 police officers who were on hand last year, as well as contingency plans to divert traffic, barricades at the ready and promises of strict enforcement of rules prohibiting open containers of alcohol.

City officials also plan on hiring a media consultant to get the word out, particularly to those who come in from outside The City.

“We’ve got to get to those outside of San Francisco. We think that is going to be our major challenge,” City Administrator Ed Lee said.

Fliers will behanded out at BART stations alerting people that the Castro Halloween party is canceled, and a number of roadway message signs putting the word out will be deployed.

Castro businesses with alcohol permits are also being asked to close down for the night that night — only 11 of the more than 100 businesses with such permits have agreed to do so thus far — and residents are being told to keep their Halloween parties indoors.

Halloween in the Castro is a decades-old party that draws more than 100,000 revelers, but it has recently been marred by violence. Last year, a gunman at the event opened fire, shooting nine people.

The San Francisco Convention and Visitors Bureau is partnering with The City to promote alternative Halloween activities. City officials abandoned plans to provide an alternative to the Castro party at a parking lot behind AT&T Park after negotiations with the promoter fell apart earlier this month.

jsabatini@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsGovernment & PoliticsLocalPolitics

Just Posted

On Sunday, California bore the brunt of what meteorologists referred to as a bomb cyclone and an atmospheric river, a convergence of storms that brought more than half a foot of rain to parts of the Bay Area, along with high winds, concerns about flash floods and the potential for heavy snow in the Sierra Nevada. Much of the Bay Area was under a flash flood watch on Sunday, with the National Weather Service warning of the potential for mudslides across the region. (NOAA via The New York Times)
Bomb cyclone, atmospheric river combine to pummel California with rain and wind

What you need to know about this historic weather event

National Weather Service flood watch in the San Francisco Bay Area for Sunday, Oct. 24, 2021. (National Weather Service via Bay City News)
Storm pounds Bay Area, leaving over 145,000 without power: Closures and updates

Torrential rainfall causes flooding, triggers evacuations in burn areas

Plan Bay Area 2050 is an expansive plan guiding the region’s growth and development over the next three decades. The regional plan addresses progressive policy priorities like a universal basic income and a region-wide rent cap, alongside massive new spending on affordable housing and transportation infrastructure. (Shutterstock)
Plan Bay Area 2050: Analyzing an extensive regional plan that covers the next 30 years

Here are the big ticket proposals in the $1.4 trillion proposal

A collaborative workspace for a decentralized autonomous organization (DAO) in Coordinape is pictured at a recent blockchain meet up at Atlas Cafe. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
Business without bosses: San Francisco innovators battle bureaucracy with blockchain

‘The next generation will work for three DAOs at the same time’

Most Read