(Photo via Foster + Partners)

(Photo via Foster + Partners)

Ground broken for second tallest structure in San Francisco

The construction of the second tallest building in San Francisco broke ground this morning near the site of what will be the Transbay Transit Center, a coming regional transit hub.

Officials turned the first shovels at 10 a.m. at First and Mission streets for the two-tower Oceanside Center, which was designed by Foster + Partners and San Francisco-based Heller Manus Architects.

The tower facing First Street will be the second highest structure in the city. The tower facing Mission Street will be the home of the city’s first Waldorf Astoria hotel.

“Today is a very exciting day for both our company and the city of San Francisco,” Oceanwide Center CEO Chen Wu said in a statement. “We look forward to giving the city a project that will be a source of pride for all San Franciscans.”

The center will be a mix of offices, condominiums and the hotel. It will also incorporate two historic buildings at 78 and 88 First Street, both of which will offer office and retail space.

The First Street tower will be 910 feet and 61 stories high. It will include 109 luxury homes from the 41st to 61st floors and about 1 million square feet of office space from the seventh to 40th floors.

The Mission Street tower will be 625 feet and 54 stories tall and home to 156 luxury homes, the Waldorf Astoria, a spa, bar and restaurant.

The condominiums in the First Street tower will be the highest in San Francisco.

The architects have planned for 26,000 square feet of public space, the pinnacle of which will be a public square or urban plaza adjacent to First Street.

Swinerton and Webcor are the builders. Swinerton is known for the construction of the San Francisco Opera House and the Fairmont Hotel.

Mayor Edwin Lee, Supervisor Jane Kim and others attended the groundbreaking.constructiondevelopmentoceanside center

Just Posted

Badly needed rain cooled off pedestrians on Market Street in The City on Wednesday. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
Storm door opens in San Francisco — what will the rains bring?

‘Come Monday, fire season in Northern California should be done’

FILE — In-N-Out Burger, the popular California fast-food chain, is resisting San Francisco's public health rules that require indoor diners to show proof of vaccination. (J. Emilio Flores/The New York Times)
When it comes to San Francisco vaccine rules, In-N-Out should heed Biblical advice

Burger chain’s vaccine fight distracts from its tasty burgers and French fries controversy

The Walgreens at 4645 Mission St. in The City is among those slated to close. <ins>(Courtesy photo)</ins>
Walgreens says it’s closing five SF stores due to crime. Where’s the data?

Walgreens should be transparent, enlighten city leaders about crime’s effect on business

Lake Hennessey, a reservoir for Napa, looked dry in June. Gov. Gavin Newsom on Tuesday issued a proclamation extending the drought emergency statewide and asked residents to redouble water conservation efforts. (Mike Kai Chen/New York Times)
Newsom declares drought emergency across California

State closed out its second-driest water year on record

While some pedestrians enjoy walking on the car-free Great Highway, others, who drive to work, want the road reopened full-time to vehicles. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
Converting the Great Highway into a Great Walkway makes no sense

It’s helpful to take a detailed look at the environmental and transit effects

Most Read