Green labels boosting value of San Francisco properties

Mike Koozmin/The S.F. ExaminerOne for the record books: Department of the Environment Director Melanie Nutter and Assessor-Recorder Phil Ting announce plans to include green certifications in public records.

Mike Koozmin/The S.F. ExaminerOne for the record books: Department of the Environment Director Melanie Nutter and Assessor-Recorder Phil Ting announce plans to include green certifications in public records.

San Francisco is adding green labels for homes and businesses to official property records, a move that is meant to acknowledge the monetary value of environmentally conscious upgrades.

On Thursday, Assessor-Recorder Phil Ting and Department of the Environment Director Melanie Nutter unveiled the new property record plan, which is the first in the nation.

“This is very cutting edge and groundbreaking,” Nutter said of the program.

#link_box { width: 175px; height: auto; margin: 0; padding: 0; margin: 10px 20px 10px 0px; padding: 10px; background-color: #fbfade; /* ecru – light yellow */ border: 1px solid #343a25; /* green – for summer arts */ float: left; font-family: arial, sans serif; font-size: 11px; } #link_box img, #link_box a { border 0px; border-style: none; outline: none; } #link_box h1 { margin: 0; padding: 5px; border-bottom: 1px solid #ddd; text-transform: none; color: #8A0808; font-family: arial, sans serif; font-weight: bold; font-size: 15px; text-align: center; } #link_box h2 { margin: 0; padding: 5px; border-bottom: 1px solid #ddd; text-transform: none; color: #000; font-family: arial, sans serif; font-weight: bold; font-size: 10px; text-align: center; } #link_box ul { list-style: none; margin: 0; padding: 0; border: none; } #link_box li { margin: 0px padding: 0px; border-bottom: 1px solid #ddd; border-bottom-width: 1px; } #link_box li a { display: block; padding: 5px 5px 5px 15px; /* Padding for bullet */ /* border-bottom: 1px solid #ddd; border-bottom-width: 1px; */ color: #000; width: 100%; width: auto; /* height: auto; */ /* border: 1px solid blue; */ margin: 0px; font-family: arial, sans serif; font-size: 11px; line-height: 14px; text-decoration: none; } #link_box li a: before { /* background-position: top left; */ } #link_box li a:hover { background-color: #ddd; color: #000; }

Speakers, including a handful from companies that give green certifications to homes and commercial buildings, pointed out how such improvements increase property values. For instance, a study released in July (see below) found that homes with green certifications are valued 9 percent higher at the time of sale than comparable properties.

Nutter said commercial buildings with green labels have 22 percent higher rent values and sell for 10 percent more than comparable buildings. Ting pointed out that when you decrease costs for a commercial building through environmental upgrades but keep income the same, the owners are making more money.

“We want to acknowledge that,” he said.

Many commercial buildings in San Francisco carry some type of label, the most popular being the LEED certification that is given through the U.S. Green Building Council, which was started in The City in 1993.

There are more than 250 buildings in The City, totaling almost 63 million square feet, that carry a green label, according to information from the Assessor-Recorder’s Office. Such labels show that “the building was designed, built and operated to have a smaller environmental footprint,” Nutter said.

Dan Geiger of the U.S. Green Building Council’s Northern California chapter said San Francisco has a high percentage of LEED certifications.

In addition to LEED, homes and buildings also can receive EnergyStar, GreenPoint Rated, Home Energy Rating System II and Home Energy Score certifications, all five of which will be added to the property records in The City.

Ting said the program will not increase the assessment value of homes and buildings, so property taxes will not change until after a property sale.

mbillings@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsGovernment & PoliticsLocalPolitics

Just Posted

Niners defensive lineman Joey Bosa played a major role in stopping the Eagles in a Week 2 San Francisco victory. (Courtesy San Francisco 49ers)
What we learned from Niners beating the Eagles

By Mychael Urban Special to The Examiner Is your glass half-empty? Niners… Continue reading

If he secured a full term in the Senate, Newsom would become the most powerful Californian Democrat since Phil Burton at the height of his career, or maybe ever. <ins>(Kevin Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
Artist Agnieszka Pilat, pictured with Spot the Robot Dog from Boston Robotics, has a gallery show opening at Modernism. (Courtesy Agnieszka Pilat)
Screenshots of VCs, Kanye and tech parties by the Bay

In this week’s roundup, Ben Horowitz’s surprising hip-hop knowledge and the chic tech crowd at Shack15

San Francisco Giants manager Gabe Kapler, pictured in July at Oracle Park, says team members simultaneously can be “measured and calm” and “looking to push the accelerator.” (Chris Victorio/Special to The Examiner)
How Gabe Kapler sets the tone for Giants’ success with strategy, mindset

‘There’s no doubt in my mind that he’s the hands-down manager of the year’

Firefighters extinguish burning material near Lake Tahoe on Sept. 3 in the wake of the Caldor Fire; environmental scientists say the huge fire is bringing to light deficiencies in forest management. <ins>(Max Whittaker/New York Times)</ins>
Cal Fire, timber industry must face an inconvenient truth

We are logging further into the wildfire and climate crisis

Most Read