Granddad Bandit stalking nation's banks

He might be elderly, but he certainly moves fast as he darts across the country, running from bank robbery to bank robbery.

The FBI has dubbed him the “Granddad Bandit,” and while his closest brush with the Washington area was his third known robbery on May 29 in Roanoke, Va., he could be here soon, authorities worry.

The first known appearance of “Granddad” — who looks to be about 60 years old — was April 10, where he passed a note demanding money to a bank teller in Houston. Two weeks later, he robbed a bank in Atlanta before making his way north to Roanoke.

In July he was spotted in Arkansas, then back to Texas. He finished the summer by hitting a bank in Birmingham, Ala., and then jumped north to Syracuse, N.Y., where he robbed a bank Sept. 22.

He's suspected of robbing a bank in Tallahassee, Fla., in October.

The FBI said it believes he has been behind at least nine bank robberies and hasn't yet established a pattern, although the majority of the robberies were in the South.

He typically passes a note to the teller and gestures to indicate he has a weapon, authorities said. He then leaves the bank on foot. The FBI is unsure of where he's from, and agents are trying to establish his identity.

The Granddad Bandit is described as a white man, about 6 feet tall and weighing about 230 pounds. He often wears a baseball cap and eyeglasses, but has been seen with his head uncovered and is balding. In most cases, he's dressed in a business-casual manner, with a dark-colored polo shirt or buttoned-down shirt.

The FBI is offering up to $10,000 for information that leads to the arrest and conviction of the Granddad Bandit.

Anyone with information should call the FBI's Washington field office at 202-278-2000.

For information about Washington-area bank robberies, visit bankbandits.org.

fklopott@washingtonexaminer.com

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