Traffic flows across the Bay Bridge toward The City. (Cindy Chew/2009 S.F. Examiner)

Traffic flows across the Bay Bridge toward The City. (Cindy Chew/2009 S.F. Examiner)

Gov. Brown signs bill approving ballot measure to hike bridge tolls

Bay Area bridge tolls may soon rise as much as $3.

Gov. Jerry Brown signed Senate Bill 595 Tuesday, authored by state Sen. Jim Beall (D-San Jose), which would authorize a region-wide vote on the toll hike to raise an estimated $4.2 billion for local transportation projects.

Though the ballot measure would hike tolls on seven Bay Area bridges if approved in 2018, the Golden Gate Bridge would not be affected because its Board of Directors sets tolls independently.

The Bay Bridge and other bridges may see a hike of up to $3, if approved by Bay Area voters. In San Francisco, those transportation dollars may help fund myriad projects requested by local officials: BART’s core capacity study, the expansion of BART’s fleet, creating a new ferry landing at Mission Bay, expanding Muni’s fleet and facilities, the Transbay Transit Center’s second phase and pedestrian and bicycle projects throughout the Bay Area.

Perhaps most notably, the toll hikes may fund a study to conceptualize the much-desired second Transbay Tube, according to San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency and BART agenda documents.

If a second Transbay Tube is one day built, BART could become a 24-hour system, or if Caltrain were to use the tracks, it could expand its service into the East Bay.

“The investments in this regional measure will also help provide important jobs, improve the quality of life and reduce emissions,” Assemblymember David Chiu, D-San Francisco, said in a statement. “Numerous provisions in the bill, including a new Inspector General for BART, will ensure that these projects deliver their promised benefits.”

The Bay Area Council, a public advocacy organization on behalf of local big-businesses interests, also hailed the measure’s approval.

“With the governor’s action today, we’re one step closer to taking a big leap forward in addressing the region’s transportation and traffic crisis,” Jim Wunderman, president and CEO of the Bay Area Council, said in a statement.
“With the funding included in this plan,” he continued, “we can make important investments to expand mass transit like BART, Caltrain and ferries, ease congestion on traffic-clogged freeways and address the number one frustration plaguing Bay Area commuters.”
Transit

Just Posted

Danielle Baskin, right, and friends hung a Halloween store banner on the sign of a mostly empty tech campus on Monday as a prank. (Photo courtesy Vincent Woo)
‘BOOgle!’ Pranksers wrap Google’s SF office park in ‘Spirit Halloween’ signage

The goof says it all about The City’s empty tech campuses

Alison Collins, a member of the San Francisco Unified School District Board of Education, listens during a board meeting. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Alison Collins speaks: Embattled SF school board member confronts the recall effort

‘It’s important for folks to know what this recall is about. It’s bigger than any one of us.’

Passengers board a BART train at Powell Street station on Friday, Oct. 23, 2020. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Powell Station death serves as a grim reminder. BART doors don’t stop for anyone

What you need to know about safety sensors on the trains

Is the Black Cat affair a distraction from the recovery of The City’s storied nightlife industry or does Mayor Breed’s behavior inadvertently highlight the predicament the industry’s been in since San Francisco reinstated indoor mask requirements on Aug. 20? (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner, 2021)
Mayor Breed mask controversy highlights nightlife businesses’ plight

‘It’s what all the venues and bars are living every single day’

If he secured a full term in the Senate, Newsom would become the most powerful Californian Democrat since Phil Burton at the height of his career, or maybe ever. <ins>(Kevin Hume/The Examiner)</ins>

Most Read