Gore 'deeply honored' by Nobel Prize

Former Vice President Al Gore said during a brief appearance before reporters in Palo Alto today that he was “deeply honored” to share this year's Nobel Peace Prize.

“It is the most dangerous challenge we have ever faced but it is also the greatest opportunity,” Gore said of climate change. Gore received the award today along with the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

Gore did not take questions at the appearance, held at the Alliance for Climate Protection, but his spokeswoman later gave an apparently definitive answer to the obvious question.

“He has no intention of running for president in 2008,” Gore spokeswoman Kalee Kreider said.

Gore learned that he was a co-winner of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize at 2 a.m. today while watching CNN with his wife Tipper, according to Kreider.

He announced early this morning that he would donate his share of the prize, approximately $750,000, to the Alliance for Climate Protection. He serves as chairman of the organization's board of directors and has made a major financial commitment to it even before today's announcement, according to Alliance for Climate Protection CEO Cathy Zoi.

“Al and Tipper Gore have made a $5 million personal commitment to the alliance, including all of his proceeds from the “Inconvenient Truth” book and film,” Zoi said. “It's a well-earned honor for the guy that's been

fighting for this for 30 years.”

Gore said activists like Zoi and thousands of others deserve the award as much as he does.

“There have been so many thousands of people who have worked as long as I have,” Gore said.

In his brief public remarks this morning, Gore said he and his wife will go to Oslo in December to accept the award. Gore has not received a congratulatory phone call from President Bush but he has received calls from several presidential candidates, Kreider said.

Kreider would not identify which candidates called Gore, if they were all Democrats or even specify the number beyond “several.”

U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein said Gore had no clue Thursday night that the prize was imminent.

“My husband and I saw him last evening, and he had no idea. So, it must be a wonderful surprise,” Feinstein said in a statement. “No one on Earth has done more to put climate change and global warming on the front

burner of public policy in virtually every country than Al Gore.”

— Bay City News

Bay Area NewsLocal

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