Google Glass woman releases video of incident at Molotov’s

Facebook.comSarah Slocum

The woman who claims she was attacked for wearing Google Glass in Molotov's in the Lower Haight last week has released some video of the incident, even though she reportedly told the patrons at the bar that she wasn't recording them.

On her Facebook page, Sarah Slocum maintains that she didn't start recording until she felt threatened by patrons in the bar during last call.

“So after I was hostility treated by the two girls, verbally assaulted and given the bird by the girl in this video for apparently their privacy/tech animosity and hatred I decided that I should start filming this extremely strange, hostile and threatening behavior,” Slocum wrote on Facebook.

At one point, a man took the Google Glasses off her face and ran out of the bar. She was able to retrieve the glasses, but in the meantime, her purse was stolen, which contained her wallet and cellphone.

Slocum herself has called the incident a hate crime, regardless of the fact that the legal definition of a hate crime does not mention Google Glass wearer or tech worker.

She filed a report with police, Officer Albie Esparza said, and told them she would turn over video of the incident to them. As of Wednesday afternoon, it was unclear if she had turned over any video evidence to police. She did post video on her Facebook page and provided more video of the incident in an exclusive interview with KRON's Gabe Slate:

The suspect description she filed with police was of a man, aged 20 to 30 years old, 5-foot-10, 160 pounds, with brown eyes and hair, wearing dark jeans, a sweater, a gray plaid hat and he had a short beard, Esparza said.

In the meantime, the story has gone viral around the world, with even Taiwan's Tomonews releasing their animated version of the incident, which nowadays means you've really made it.

The incident once again seems to highlight the friction between longtime San Francisco residents and workers in the tech industry, who many blame for displacing longtime residents and clogging city bus stops with their buses and shuttles.

On Tuesday, The Chronicle covered a meeting meant to bridge the divide between tech workers and housing activists, where things quickly devolved into something less than a thoughtful dialogue.

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