Google asks for permission to hold party in park

Richmond district residents may be treated to the sonic stylings of U2 and Journey cover bands if Google wins approval today for a private nighttime concert in Golden Gate Park next month.

Google leaders are requesting a city exemption in order to boogie downJune 11 with 1,400 members of the Internet giant’s national sales team. If the Recreation and Park Commission votes in favor of the idea, it would be Google’s first event with national promoter Live Nation to be held on the park’s Music Concourse.

Events are frequently held in Golden Gate Park, but few take place at night, when much of the park is closed to visitors, according to Recreation and Park Department spokeswoman Rose Dennis.

Some neighbors discourage after-hours soirees because of the noise, litter and inebriation that often comes with them, according to Ron Miguel, president of the Planning Association for the Richmond.

“I don’t care where it is in the park, it’s adjacent to a residential district,” Miguel said. “My objection is to the 10 p.m. hour — I look to 9 o’clock as reasonable.”

In 2006, neighbors’ concerns led The City to establish a maximum noise level of 105 decibels at Sharon Meadow.

Google’s affair is slated to be much smaller, with a picnic-style dinner, soft drinks and alcohol, and music by a pair of bands playing Journey and U2 covers, according to a report from Sandy Lee, recreation supervisor for the Recreation and Park Department.If approved, Google would post a $1 million insurance bond, plus $20,860.48 in fees to The City.

bwinegarner@examiner.com

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