Golden Gate Bridge foot, bicycle traffic to return to near-normal

Examiner file photoTight squeeze: Pedestrians and cyclists on the Golden Gate Bridge have seen months of cramped conditions.

After nearly five months of cramped conditions on the Golden Gate Bridge, the bike and pedestrian traffic flows on the span were expected to return to normal this weekend — almost.

The bridge district, which normally designates the east sidewalk for pedestrians, and the west sidewalk for bicyclists (most of the time), had to shift the two groups around this year due to needed construction work on the span.

Retrofit work on the span that shut down a portion of the east sidewalk was completed Friday (seven weeks early), once again allowing pedestrians to walk the length of the bridge. Bicyclists, who had been shifted to the east sidewalk this year while work carried out on the west side will return to their normal hours of operation.

That means that cyclists will use the west sidewalk during the weekends, holidays and from 3:30 p.m. to sunset on weekdays. Pedestrians will remain on the east sidewalk at all times.

The only snag is that there will be 15-minute “halt” periods on the east sidewalks during the workweek. Bikers and walkers on that side will have to momentarily stop while construction crews move their equipment around the bridge’s main cable.

wreisman@sfexaminer.com

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