Glen Park BART station closed after device found

A suspicious object discovered near the Glen Park BART station forced the station and a nearby street to close for several hours Thursday morning.

San Francisco police Sgt. Steve Mannina said a passer-by saw what looked like a suspicious device on the curb at the corner of Arlington and Bosworth streets. Mannina described the device as “three dark cylinders,” but said he did not see it himself.

“It’s not a galvanized pipe with caps on the ends,” he said, referring to a common type of pipe bomb.

Mannina said the San Francisco Police Department’s bomb squad used their bomb robot, which has a mechanical arm, to pick up the device, put it into a container and render it safe. “The term is ‘disrupt’ it, and I can’t talk any further about the procedure the bomb squad uses,” he said.

Police shut down the area one block in each direction at about 10:10 a.m. They had the streets entirely reopened at 12:30 p.m.

The Glen Park BART station also closed from about 11 a.m. until 12:11 p.m., BART spokesman Linton Johnson said. Trains traveled through the station but did not stop there. The closure caused no delays.

Passengers heading to Glen Park station on BART had to get off at either the 24th Street station to the north or the Balboa Park station to the south and take Muni to their destinations, Johnson said.

Municipal Railway had to reroute four bus lines — the 26-Valencia, 23-Monterey, 44-O’Shaughnessy and 52-Excelsior — around the intersection, according to Muni spokeswoman Maggie Lynch.

But while some transit riders were inconvenienced by the closure, local businesses seemed not to mind. John Choi, who owns Glen Park Delicatessen and Liquors at the corner of Diamond and Bosworth streets, said he didn’t notice much of an impact from the closure.

Farther down Diamond Street, at Pebbles Café, employee Alice Teng said the closure helped business. “Actually, people can’t take BART, so they come in here,” she said. “We had a little fun because everybody was talking about it in here.”

Sheena Lee, who owns the cafe, said the closure was unusual. “I’ve been here for 12 years. It’s never happened before,” she said.

In an unrelated event, the Fremont BART station was closed briefly Wednesday night while officers investigated reports of a suspicious device.

amartin@examiner.com

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