Giants, others ready to take swing

Pitches by four teams eager to develop a 16-acre lot currently used by the Giants for parking will be publicly presented before San Francisco Port officials on Tuesday.

The Port wants to develop the lot south of AT&T Park, calledSeawall Lot 337, to generate revenue for the agency, which is required by city law to be self-supporting. The land is the largest vacant parcel in San Francisco’s burgeoning Mission Bay neighborhood, according to Port officials.

An eight-member advisory panel, which includes senior city employees, local businesspeople, architects and planners, will evaluate the proposals, Port Deputy Director Diane Oshima said, adding that the final decision will be based upon formal selection criteria.

Of the four, the most high-profile proposal was drafted by a group led by the Giants, which uses the lot for game-day parking under a lease that will expire in late 2009.

While the baseball franchise recently took its proposal to the media to generate support for its mixed-use development plan that includes a waterfront park, three other developer-architect teams also submitted proposals by the Port’s Feb. 14 deadline.

One of the plans earmarks three-quarters of the land as public open space, according to Federal Development spokesman Brett Gladstone. The proposal also includes four “slender towers” of between 16 and 24 floors that closely mimic building heights in nearby Mission Bay.

The third proposal promises to establish an arts district and provide affordable studio space for artists, Kenwood Investments spokesman Darius Anderson said. He said the plan includes multiple buildings, including two tall office towers and a tall residential building.

The fourth proposal, which was crafted by a local collaberation of architects, designers and planners, aims to be “provocative,” Build Inc. spokesman Loring Sagan said.

The plan features condominiums and apartment buildings, a wholesale flower market, a “quirky” tent structure, and an office building custom-made for companies that specialize in clean, green and sustainable technology, according to Sagan.

The criteria list, drafted by the Port, stressed the importance of public open space and the expansion of China Basin Park. The list calls for a pedestrian- and transit-friendly design with plenty of parking spots, and it requires new buildings to complement nearby towers.

After the proposals are presented on Tuesday, they’ll be discussed by the advisory panel during a daylong workshop on March 1, according to Oshima.

jupton@examiner.com

Seawall Lot 337 proposals

Team: Build Inc., Cherokee Investment Partners, UrbanGreen Devco

Feature: An incubator building for companies that specialize in clean and green technologies

Team: Kenwood Investments, Boston Properties, Wilson Meany Sullivan

Feature: An arts district similar to the Torpedo Factory Art Center in Virginia

Team: Federal Development, Lehman Brothers, Construction Management and Development

Feature: Three-quarters of the land would be dedicated to public open space

Team: San Francisco Giants, The Cordish Co., Farallon Capital Management

Feature: 2,000 parking spaces built specially for ballpark visitors

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