Giants help boost city’s image

Restaurants, bars, taxi companies and sports memorabilia shops will be the most immediate beneficiaries of the Giants’ stirring run to the postseason — and with the national spotlight set to shine on The City, San Francisco should benefit from the team’s playoff appearance for years to come.

More than 42,000 fans came to AT&T Park to cheer the Giants to victory against the San Diego Padres on Sunday, and countless thousands more filled local establishments to watch the game on television. With the Giants set to compete in the playoffs for the first time in seven years starting Thursday, The City’s service industry should enjoy an economic lift from the enthusiasm generated by the team’s success.

“Citywide, this really creates a festive mood,” said Kevin Westlye, executive director of the Golden Gate Restaurant Association. “Obviously, sports bars are going to benefit from this, but so are takeout places because you’re going to get eight to 10 fans gathering at a house to watch the games.”

Peter Osborne, owner of MoMo’s sports bar and restaurant across the street from the ballpark, said the establishment’s revenue increases by 75 percent during home games.

“There is no question that baseball is our harvest season,” Osborne said. “And this year’s crop of baseball is yielding a little extra fruit.”

According to Joe D’Alessandro, president of the San Francisco Convention and Visitors Bureau, about one-third of the 42,000 people expected for each home game will come from out of town, providing extra business to local hotels, cab companies and restaurants. And the timing is good for this week’s games, since they directly precede the popular Fleet Week event scheduled for the weekend.

“People are going to come to The City for the games,” D’Alessandro said, “and extend their stay into a real San Francisco vacation because of all the attractions here.”

There will be a long-term benefit, too.

“The real benefit is the exposure The City gets,” said Jim Lazarus, public policy director for the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce. “All these beautiful shots of San Francisco on national television could be the difference-maker in getting a convention to come here in 2012, or a couple in the Midwest to set up their vacation here next summer.”

 

NLCS tickets go on sale — but buyers better hurry up

Although the opening game of the National League Division Series has yet to take place, Giants fans can purchase tickets for NL Championship Series home games starting today.

At 3 p.m., tickets for the next playoff round will be available through the Giants’ website, www.sfgiants.com, and by phone at (877) 473-4849. There will not be any in-person sales locations offering the tickets.

Tickets for the NLDS games against the Atlanta Braves sold out in a half-hour. There were 5,000 tickets available for each of the possible three home games.

On Monday, tickets for view-reserve seats — which are in the third deck at AT&T Park — for the Thursday and Friday games against the Braves were listed on Craigslist for $50, while lower-box seats were going for $200 apiece. Bleacher seats also were listed at $50.

The cost of tickets set to go on sale today ranges from $40 to $160. Most of the tickets available for the general public are in the $40 to $58 range. Those seats are available in the bleacher section and the view-reserve section.

Fans can purchase up to four tickets for each potential home game in the NLCS for as many as four games. If the Giants are knocked out in the first round by the Braves, purchases will be refunded.

 

NLCS games

Tickets for the potential next Giants playoff round are going on sale.

When: 3 p.m. today
Online: www.sfgiants.com/postseason
Phone: (877) 473-4849
No in-person sales will be conducted

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