Giants fans prep for World Series

Mike Koozmin/The S.F. ExaminerRain and shine: Fans at AT&T Park cheer Monday after watching the Giants clinch the NL pennant; orange aficionados are hoping the win streak continues today.

Mike Koozmin/The S.F. ExaminerRain and shine: Fans at AT&T Park cheer Monday after watching the Giants clinch the NL pennant; orange aficionados are hoping the win streak continues today.

Giants fans walked in a daze Tuesday morning near the team’s soggy waterfront ballpark, still not quite believing that just hours earlier their rain-soaked squad had clinched the National League pennant.

As dozens flocked to the team’s merchandise store, snatching up sundry items and celebrating the Giants’ unlikely comeback victory over the St. Louis Cardinals in the National League Championship Series, the reality began to set in.

Jack McKenna, a lifelong Giants fan, and his newlywed wife, a Tigers fan, were in town from Florida on their honeymoon and planned to buy tickets for one of the first two games, tonight or Thursday.

When they planned to spend their honeymoon in San Francisco, neither thought it would include the World Series.

“The timing was just great,” Jack McKenna said, clutching his newly purchased gear.

His wife, Sharon, still was not sure if she would loudly root for Detroit if the couple managed to score seats.

“That’s not a good way to start a marriage,” she said with a chuckle.

The cheapest tickets on Stubhub.com to tonight’s first game of the World Series against the Detroit Tigers were already $382 for the nosebleeds; thousands of dollars were being asked for premium field-level perches.

Ticket sales were brisk for the Fall Classic, yet reaction on the street was still one of Giants fans coming to grips with the dramatic come-from-behind series win.

“Being underdogs in the last two series against Cincinnati and then coming back against them … and then having our backs against the wall [against St. Louis] and coming back and winning it. Nobody figured it; it was great,” said Don Brenes, 61, of San Francisco.

Some fans admitted they were not making plans for the World Series and had doubted their team would pull off wins in the record-tying six elimination games against the Reds and Cardinals they needed to make it.

That has led to a scramble throughout the Bay Area to reschedule plans for tonight. Bars are preparing for crowds and parties are being planned for at least four more games in the Giants’ season.

“Numerous times I thought it was over; it looked so bleak,” said Kay Cockerill, standing in line at the AT&T Park store with shirts and socks. “But the momentum can change, and it just flips around and the confidence just multiplies.”

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