Gay pride banners may be allowed to stay on Market Street

The fate of the illegal pride banners on the historic light posts that line Market Street might be saved even though preservationists are worried about the flag fixtures bleeding rust.

The Historic Preservation Commission on Wednesday voted to advise the Board of Supervisors to remove the dilapidated flags and replace them under the condition they are monitored and the steel used to secure them is reconsidered.

Supervisor Bevan Dufty’s legislation would allow the banners to remain permanently, but be replaced every three years because the banners that exist now were installed illegally and have been left to linger for a decade.

City law only permits fixtures for about 30 days through the Department of Public Works.

The Historic Preservation Commission would have to award the sponsor a certificate that OKs them first.

However, there is one discrepancy that could come up later.

Since the proposal would only allow the neighborhood markers from Castro to Church streets, preservationists might appeal one block at Sanchez and Market streets that is technically considered the Mission Dolores neighborhood.

kkelkar@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsBevan DuftyGovernment & PoliticsPoliticsSan FranciscoUnder the Dome

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