A woman crosses at Fremont and Howard streets where the road is closed around the shuttered Salesforce Transit Center after the discovery of a second cracked steel beam on Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2018. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

A woman crosses at Fremont and Howard streets where the road is closed around the shuttered Salesforce Transit Center after the discovery of a second cracked steel beam on Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2018. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Fremont Street to reopen for Monday commute; Salesforce Transit Center to remain closed

Fremont Street, which has been closed between Howard and Mission
Streets in downtown San Francisco since Sept. 25 after cracks were discovered in a steel beam in the Salesforce Transit Center, will reopen in time for the Monday morning commute, the Transbay Joint Powers Authority announced Sunday.

Though the street will be reopened, the Salesforce Transit Center itself will remain closed for the near future, a TJPA spokesperson said. Transit operators will continue to provide bus service from the “Temporary Transbay Terminal” at Howard and Main streets.

Fremont Street’s reopening should help with downtown traffic
congestion that got significantly worse after the Sept. 25 closure.

The discovery of the first fissure in a steel beam in the ceiling of the third-level bus deck on the eastern side of the Salesforce Transit Center near Fremont Street prompted a temporary closure of the building and of Fremont Street underneath it. Additional inspections revealed a second fissure at the Fremont Street location.

The First Street side of the Salesforce Transit Center also will
be reinforced as a proactive measure. Testing and ongoing monitoring show no fissures on steel beams on the First Street, which have the same basic design as the beams of the Fremont Street side, the TJPA said Sunday.

Crews will work on First Street-side shoring work between 9 p.m.
and 5 a.m. to minimize traffic impacts; no nighttime roadway closures of First Street are scheduled.

Transit information is available at 511 or 511.org.
Transit

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