Fremont man accused of trying to support terrorist group

A Fremont man is being accused by federal prosecutors of trying to provide support for a terrorist group.

A federal grand jury in San Francisco returned an indictment unsealed Thursday charging 22-year-old Adam Shafi with one count of attempting to provide material support or resources to a designated foreign terrorist organization, according to a press release from Acting United States Attorney Brian J. Stretch.

According to the indictment, Shafi tried to provide personnel to al-Nusrah Front (ANF), a group designated by the Department of State as a Foreign Terrorist Organization and as a Specially Designated Global Terrorist entity.

The indictment claims Shafi provided the support, knew ANF was a designated foreign terrorist organization and that the organization had engaged in terrorist activity, the release said.

Shafi was stopped at San Francisco International Airport on June 30 as he was about to board a non-stop flight to Istanbul, Turkey, according to an FBI affidavit.

Turkey’s a common point of entry into Syria for foreign fighters hoping to join terrorist organizations like ANF and Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant.

According to the press release, the affidavit details numerous telephone conversations Shafi had with friends in the days and weeks leading up to his trip during which he expressed his love of “Jaulani,” the amir of ANF, his willingness to “die with them,” his hope that “Allah doesn’t take [his] soul until [he has] at least, like, a couple gallons of blood that [he’s] spilled for him,” his fear of meeting Allah “when [his] face has no scars on it,” and his progress in saving enough money for his trip.

Shafi was arrested on July 3, based on a complaint filed in the case.

Both the complaint and indictment were unsealed Thursday morning in open court when Shafi appeared before Judge Sallie Kim for his arraignment hearing. A Dec. 22 bail hearing has been set for Shafi, who remains in custody, the release said.
Adam Shafial-Nusrah FrontANFANYCrimeIstanbulSan FranciscoSFTerrorismTurkey

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