Fraud inspector faces dismissal

A San Francisco police fraud inspector hit with 11 misconduct charges — including cashing $25,800 in stolen checks — could find out Wednesday if she will be the fourth city cop fired in the last decade.

Inspector Marvetia Richardson made headlines last year for filing a federal lawsuit against the city of Antioch and its Police Department after being shot in 2007 with a Taser in her Antioch home.

But in charges made public because Richardson asked for the hearing to be open, a number of other complaints about the officer have surfaced.

Richardson is accused of using the computer records system to track down information that was then used to inform a man’s wife of an affair. She is also suspected of harassing a fellow employee at the Department, and calling in sick 29 times without filing for sick pay.

The latest charge involves six stolen checks cashed by Richardson, which were allegedly arranged as payment from her tenant, Bridget Reed. Reed had allegedly convinced a third party, Jason Metz, to steal checks out of his father’s checkbook.

Those checks were then written to Richardson for back rent, school expenses, car expenses and a birthday trip. Richardson would use the checks, totaling $28,800.50, for her mortgage expenses, according to the complaint.

“Despite being a 15-year member of the San Francisco Police Department with prior law enforcement experience from other agencies and a trained fraud investigator, the accused never contacted [the victims] to inquire about the authenticity of the checks…” the complaint said.

Quinton Cutlip, an attorney for Richardson, disputed the claims in a hearing before the Police Commission that occurred in July. Several charges were already past their statute of limitations, he said Tuesday, and many of them were simply untrue.

“I’m not going to comment on everything,” he said.

Police Commissioners may vote on termination at Wednesday’s 5:30 p.m. meeting.

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