Founder of charitable group visits San Francisco

Christine Fabiani Shively, founder of Knots-of-Love, has a team of more than 1,000 volunteers across the country who knit and crochet caps for patients undergoing chemotherapy. She will be in The City on Nov. 11 to meet with administrators from treatment centers.

How many caps do you donate? Last month we donated 3,295 caps, which is pretty amazing. We go up about 500 caps every month. If we had more members we could certainly donate more caps. Since June 2007, when we were founded, we’ve donated 30,529 caps all across the country.

What will you be doing in San Francisco? I’m starting my “Warming Hearts Road Tour,” and I will be visiting the cancer centers that we donate our caps to, starting from Newport Beach to San Francisco and back again.

Former President Bill Clinton recently endorsed Knots-of-Love. Since then, have requests for caps increased? Yes, almost every day we’re seeing an increase. Since President Clinton recognized us we’ve been getting a lot of calls from people looking for caps for themselves or for family members.

How can people get involved? All the information is on our Web site, www.kolinfo.org. You can donate money or you can find out how to make a cap because there are specific yarns, since chemo heads are extremely sensitive. The Web site has all the proper yarns to use.

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