Foster City officials: Revenue outweighs high school

While parents continue to campaign for a high school for Foster City’s children, officials say a more important priority is the city’s long-term economic health.

Most of the high school students in the city currently attend Hillsdale High School. Local parents, however, say a high school, especially for students east of Highway 101, is essential, and want one built on a long-empty lot next to city offices on Forster City Boulevard.

Foster City Mayor Linda Koelling said a mixed-use development, possibly including a school, would likely be the best option, however.

“In difficult economic times, this becomes valuable property,” Koelling said. “[The site] might include a theater, housing, retail or some sort of school. But it has to … bring in revenue the city will need long term so we can provide services in the future.”

The Foster City High School Foundation, a nonprofit aiming to bring a high school to town, is continuing talks with two charter schools in hopes of realizing their goal. But the group plans on waiting until the city decides the fate of the 15-acre site before submitting a petition to the district, foundation President Phyllis Moore said.

Moore acknowledged viable revenue streams are essential, and pointed out that successful schools drive up property values and, therefore, generate more property taxes.

Councilwoman Pam Frisella agreed that it’s high time to get a revenue-generator on that site because the city was forced to dip into its reserves over the last few years.

tramroop@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsLocalPeninsula

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Indoor dining at John’s Grill. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
State’s mask mandate to continue until June 15 reopening despite CDC guidance

By Eli Walsh Bay City News Foundation California will wait until next… Continue reading

A cyclist heads past an artistic sign onto Page Street, a Slow Street, at Stanyan Street near Golden Gate Park on Monday, April 12, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Push to make street closures permanent meets with resistance

Hastily thrown together during the pandemic, Slow Streets program now struggles to build support

Agnes Liang, who will be a senior at Mission High School, is running for one of the two student representative seats on the San Francisco Unified School District Board of Education. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Turbulent year on school board leaves student delegates undeterred

Around this time last year, Shavonne Hines-Foster and Kathya Correa Almanza were… Continue reading

(Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Three people killed in SF shootings in less than 24 hours

San Francisco police were scrambling Saturday to respond to a series of… Continue reading

Most Read